Lecture notes from the the first semester.

Contents

  1. Week 35
    1. Team building
      1. The Academy of Untammed Creativity
  2. Week 36
    1. Learning and the responsibilities for learning
      1. Thøger Michelsen, Attractor
      2. Jørgen Clausen, Testrup Højskole
      3. Jette Laursen, CVU
      4. Kjeld Fredens, The Danish council of competences
  3. Week 37
    1. Project Design
      1. Uffe Elbæk, KP
      2. Bjarne Stark, Learning Zone KP
      3. Peter Busch, Learning Zone KP
      4. Niko Grünferld, Development Zone KP
      5. Ketan Lakhani
      6. Bliss Brown, Imagine Chicago
  4. Week 38
    1. Project Design
      1. Peter Busch, Learning Zone, KP
      2. Niko Grünferld, Development Zone KP
  5. Week 39
    1. Process Design
      1. Toke Møller, Inter Change
      2. Floris Koot, Development Zone KP
      3. Kirstine Simoni og Jacob Paaske, Danish Youth Council
      4. Goos Geuersen
      5. The Chaos Alliance, Lemmy Kook, Oufa Rian, Morten Ove
      6. Gry Guldberg, Development Zone KP
      7. Mick Cordero and Jonas Lidman, KP Team 10
      8. The Chaos Alliance, Lemmy Kook, Oufa Rian, Morten Ove
      9. Gry Guldberg, Development Zone KP
      10. Mick Cordero and Jonas Lidman, KP Team 10
  6. Week 40
    1. Sharpen your senses
      1. Janne Vind
      2. Gry Guldberg, Learning Zone KP
  7. Week 41
    1. Creative Design
      1. Kasper Arentoft, Learning Zone KP
      2. Lars Worning
      3. Karoline Kjeldtoft, Designer
      4. Lars Worning
      5. Karoline Kjeldtoft, Designer
      6. Nikki Bonne, Photografer
  8. Week 42
    1. Fall Vacation
  9. Week 43
    1. Creative Design
      1. Kasper Arentoft, Learning Zone KP
      2. Nikki Bonne, Photografer
  10. Week 44
    1. Organisation, Systemic Thinking and Leadership
      1. Ouafa Rian
      2. Ebbe Lundgård, COOP Norden and former Miniter of Culture
      3. Uffe Elbæk, KP
      4. Ørjan Jensen
      5. Frank Aggerholm, Danish University of Education
      6. Ebbe Lundgård, COOP Norden and former Miniter of Culture
      7. Uffe Elbæk, KP
      8. Ørjan Jensen
      9. Frank Aggerholm, Danish University of Education
      10. Johan Galtung, Founder of The International Peace Research Institute
      11. Laila Wodke Nissen, Physical Trainer
  11. Week 45
    1. Marketing and Branding
      1. Kasper Arentoft, Learning Zone KP
      2. Dag Ingefjeld
  12. Wekk 46
    1. Marketing and Branding
      1. Synnøve Finden Workshop
      2. Process with Team 1 Norway
  13. Wekk 47
    1. Marketing and Branding
      1. Group Work
  14. Wekk 48
    1. Marketing and Branding
      1. Group Work
  15. Wekk 49
    1. Marketing and Branding
      1. Group Work
  16. Wekk 50
    1. First Semester Evaluation
      1. Evaluation on Group Projects, Kasper Arentoft
      2. Evaluation of Trip to Norway, Gry Guldberg
      3. Evaluation of First Semester, Tine Meisner

Week 35

Team building

The Academy of Untammed Creativity

Week 36

Learning and the responsibilities for learning

Thøger Michelsen, Attractor

A Practical Perspective on Learning Theories By Thøger Riis Michelsen

www.attractor.dk

Main focus:

• Appreciative inquiry

• How do I learn?

• What will I do to learn the most?

ZPD - Zone for Proximal Development • A dialogue between a student and his/her future

• not a dialogue between a student and the teacher’s past

Elements of the learning experience

Auditorial

Laboratorial

Experiencing/implementing

Past experiences and expectations

A student pursues a problem/project by using already known experiences integrated with new knowledge and understanding. Through trial-error you evaluate this integration. This constructs a new understanding/higher level understanding. Learning is evaluation.

Exercise: How do I learn? Divide into groups. Each group has the following characters:

The storyteller Share an experience where he or she learned something

The interviewer Ask for details in the story told by the storyteller.

Listener (can be more than one)

What is the exercise good for?

• Focus on how I learn

• Compare and share experiences

• Evaluation

• Reflection

• Sharpen self-consciousness

• Be surprised by differences and similarities

Giving and taking an education Remember to be aware of the difference between giving and taking and education. The standard Scandinavian school system is based on giving students an education. Maybe KP can be a school for people taking their education.

Heliotrop as a principle for learning

Helio = sun

Trop = turning

It is referring to the sunflower that follows the sun throughout the day.

Hawthorn studies – shows that the teacher’s expectations control much of the learning process.

People/organizations have a tendency to move towards their expectations about the future Positive ideas and expectations about the future is therefore very important Positive expectations open up a room for dialogue where people can express their wishes about the future. By realizing the desired scenario you generate an increased engagement and activity level.

Exercise: What do I want to learn? How will I learn this – what training do I need? What help do I need?

Go into groups of two & answer these questions.

Compentence – thinking, doing and wanting

Knowledge Theory Brains

Skill Practical Ability Hands

Attitude Will and Passion Spirit

Leadership and followship

Constructive followship

• Give authority away

• React clearly

• Tell people if they are not constructive

• Relate to the process

• Bring in constructive ideas

• Offer your assistance

• Focus on the positive aspects of the process

• Give the leader time to evaluate the different suggestions

Exercise: Non-stop writing Write for 7-8 minutes starting with the following sentence: When I think about my preferred way of learning then…

Jørgen Clausen, Testrup Højskole

Learning and Globalization By Jørgen Clausen

Main focus: • Concept of lifelong learning • Self generating software (people as modern robots) • The Danish folk high school - “Folkehøyskole”

Lifelong learning “Die in a competent way” – the sole definition of lifelong learning

• Remember to be critical of the gospel of the future as well as aspects of the past. • Be critical of the modern world and remember to reflect, not only react.

Danish Folk high school - A Scandinavian phenomenon - A high school with open classes, no hand-outs and no grades – an open environment. - N. F. S. Grundtvig (1783-1872)

Restricted learning situations versus Open learning situations • Lecturers presenting slides/Power points • Engaged lecturers • Students reading the slides • Students choose their subjects • Teachers handing out the slides

The gospel of Jørgen Clausen • Let the subject be the goal, not tools to get good grades • Stress who you are, rather then how clever you are in a traditional way • No subject is larger than life, so remember life and live an important life

• Ask yourself: Why am I here? Where do I wish to end up? What are my values? Am I living my life? Do I out thoughts/desires into action?

• Learning institutions are now being run as companies, minimizing individuals taking educations focusing on learning experiences that take long time. Study: Latin origin Studio meaning Desire, Lust • Kaospilot school – is being flexible and open only virtues? Is there too little criticism? Reflect more on the processes you are in. (In Roskide university they have started a new study: Self branding Is that about self-pimping or self-realization/exploring yourself?)

Globalization What are our hopes for the future? Do we want a happy society or a small Japan (stressful, high suicide rate)? We need to have this in mind when we create learning institutions as well.

Jette Laursen, CVU

Kjeld Fredens, The Danish council of competences

Week 37

Project Design

Uffe Elbæk, KP

Bjarne Stark, Learning Zone KP

Peter Busch, Learning Zone KP

Niko Grünferld, Development Zone KP

Dynamic Project Management By Nico Grünfeld

ICF – international coaching federation - http://www.coachfederation.org/eweb/

Outcome: ▪ That you know how to start up a dynmic project

▪ That you can experiment with different models in your future workonesa re closed.

▪ Understand the DP-mindset (the KP-mindset)

Dialogue vs discussion Arguments, having right (hmm) vs. development mutual understanding

Questions and exercises ▪ What is my expectations for the lecture:

What is dynamic project managements vs a more traditional approach, what windows are opened up to me and which

▪ What are our dreams:

E.g Elisabeth New PC Develop painting Travel with Torfinn New shower Be certain of my ideas, my strengths and find environment to use them during and after school.

What is the purpose of telling our dreams?

▪ Create a positive mindset

▪ Be aware of what you want, what you are interested in,

What can dreams lead to? ▪ Happiness

▪ Boredom

▪ Potential

▪ Visions

▪ Hope

Think of this question in the break. What is to fulfill a dream? ▪ To create reality, shape reality

▪ To partake in reality, make it some of me

▪ Feeling of achievement

Questions written on a different board, somewhere else in the room. Spend 7 min to write the answers. ▪ Why are you here today?'

Interested Curious Hungry for knowledge See new solutions and perspectives

▪ What drives you in a project?

The end result, but also the creation

▪ From what perspektive would you like to see the world from this week?

Open minded Focus on my strengths

▪ What are you aiming to learn?

See different solutions on how. Get concrete tools on how to lead, gjennomføre a project

▪ Why did we do this exercise?

Be focused on what to get out the class

TEAM PERFORMANCE Who are you today? Why are you the way you the way are? Listen to the team players. What are the goals of the members? Be not only aware of the the goals and results, but also the process.

Team performance model Drexler/Sibbet – www.grove.com

1. Orientation – why are you here?

2. Trustbuilding – who are you? (Skills, but also hobbies)

3. Goals, visions, purpose – who are we? What do we want?= The preject

4. Commitment – Will we do it?

5. Implementation - Time and action plans (gannt charts, timetables)

6. High performance: Wow (if things goes smoothly, be the inspiration, aim higher, bring in new ideas)

7. Renewal/Future – what is next? (Do we need to reconsider, have times/society changed, what needs to be done to improve)

As a project manager don’t be afraid to say that we need breaks

▪ Why are you thoughts on this model?

▪ What is the consequenses of dropping the preject phase? Not unfold the potensial of you team members and raise the potential

Designing the alliance – create the context for the preject or for getting to know new people.

▪ What is the biggest difference between a traditional and dynamic project Goal-oriented vs vision-oriented project Symphony orchestra vs jam-session

▪ Turning visions/dreams into real-world realizations, instead of creating an overall vision for a real-world business.

▪ What is the energy in the room? Let people speak up. Blurt out.

PROJECT PHASES

▪ Preject – personal and project wise.

▪ Decisions platform:

▪ Goal setting phase (precision vs motivation – when describing the goal)

▪ Concept development phase (realism vs symbolism)

▪ Implication phase (management vs examination)

▪ Evaluation phase ()justification vs strategy/learning

PROJECT GUIDE Project and goal clarification 1. Title

2. Foreword

3. Need (Question #1 – Is there an internal and external needs?)

4. Background (Surroundings? Competitors? Market? Technology? Political signals?)

5. Idea (Basic idea? Story? What is the added value?)

6. Vision (Short power sentence – slogan?)

7. Purpose (Short term and long term achievements?)

8. Values (What values do we reflect? And are reflected?)

9. Principles (Underlying principles? Eg. The Kaospilot six values)

10. Dynamic process goal (What should we do? What are our goals?)

11. Team (Why am I here? Who are you? What do we want/need? Roles? Learning goals? Interested parties? Network? Competences? Challenges? Resources? CSC?)

12. Rules of the game (How do we want to communicate? Decision prosess?)

13. Project metaphor (A common picture on the project’s challenges/potensial/complexity?)

Creative concept development

14. Concept (Describe the concept in detail?)

15. Creativity

16. Dynamic time and action plan (Visualize the dynamic goal? Wha has to be done?)

17. Resources

18. Points of special attetion

Methods

Implementation of dynamic goal

19. Script/follow up

20. Putting into perspective

21. Making the project visible

22. Reflection adn learning

23. Conclusion

Methods

Main elements in a project ▪ Need – Idea – Vision/Purpose – Principles/Values – Concept – Team – Action

Game plan: Se gameplan.ai

▪ Idea vs Concept The idea of what you want to do. The concept is how you want to do it.

Ketan Lakhani

Personal Leadership By Ketan Lakhani

Zulu phrases: Sani Bonani I see you all Ubuntu Ngamuntu Ababantu I am only a person through other persons

Starting exercise: Write down the following on a note: 1. Who are you? 2. A learning question 3. What is your fear today/here?

1. The first question was answered by most of us by stating: Age, nationality and name. Why do we do this? • Habit • Skandinavian Language Complex (whatever this is)

2. Remember the distinction between a learning question and describing learning goals. A question gives you a possibility of an answer.

3. It is remember to get to know your fears. Take reponsibility for your own fear/anxiety. You, yourself should know what you should take responsibilty for and what you shouldn’t care about. When it comes to the feeling of inadequacy – remember to compare yourself to similar sizes. Or else you will easily come out as inferior.

These three parts states: 1. Who we are 2. What we desire 3. What we fear - and they determine our behaviour.

Is there a difference between leadership and personal leadership?

Exercise: Group A answers this question: Write down the qualities of a leader Answers: Able to listen, strong, having drive, risk taking, having overview, motivated/motivating, balanced.

Group B answers this question: Think of a person you personally know as a leader and write down hers/his qualities. Answers: Respectful, emphatic, calm, consistant, experienced, resourceful, clear, having an overview, wize

Group A emphasizes external qualities and action whereas Group B focuses on internal qualities and though.

What is leadership? In what areas do we find books on leadership?

Business Military What are the kjennemerke of these areas? Politics They are: hierachical, power-oriented, ”aggresive”, focused on single Religion ideas. Masculin endevors.

1839 – Industrual Revolution Introduced mass production and changed the notion of leadership. Leadership became a commodity.

I am only a person through other persons

If you treat a person as less than human, it will affect you. If you where alone on a lonely island with one another person that you treat as less than human, you will self suffer a loss of humanity. This less than human can’t see you as fully human either.

Ketan’s vision of the layers in an organization or a society

How can we change the wetware?

Exercise: Write down your 10 most important values on post-it notes. Then reduce the 10 to six, then to 3, then to 1.

Was a person the value you ended up with? In that case you are fucked, that person will eventually die. Does it mean that if that person die, your value die? Remember to separate the symbol from the object.

What decides out choices? Why are you making the chioces you do? Ketan believes you can alter everything within a person if you just go far enough through the layers that determines our choices. For some changes you need to go all the way back and change the worldview.

Perspective Remember that you are the person that out meaning into things. The perspective can change.

Resistance to change Exercise: Fold your arms around eachother. Then fold them again, but this time let the opposite arm be on top.

We have a natural resistance to change, because every change means a death. How should we as a leader be aware of the different stages people go through when they meet change and how should we act?

Bliss Brown, Imagine Chicago

Designing a change process of a whole city

HOW DO WE CREATE SPACE FOR POSSIBILITY Eg. Lynfabrikken – physical space for design possibilities.

▪ Distinction Work and home/lessure

Public and private life – more safe at home

To be able to be bring in the best from the different areas. Eg. Lynfabrikken: The room is multirealized – homey, store, cafe, working space.

Space and possiblities – create mountains in Denmark using tankers and airplanes

Exercise: Context and perspective

Circle: 0

Number: 103

Number: M0M

Sunset and mountains: M0M

▪ Mental maps The edge between the familiar and the unknown

How do persieve ourselves? Focus on the solutions/possibilities for change rather than the problem.

▪ What makes life more open, more filled with possibilities: Mental maps Difference – multiplicity (mangfold) Synergy – innovation Dialogue – communication Being on the edge/learning:

▪ not knowing the end result

▪ not pretending to know

▪ taking risks

Trust/safety

Community

Open minedness

Whole heartedness

Power of language

▪ Who make the change, who are in charge?

”We” are – the community are.

Divided imagination about the city – divides people, institutionize the difference and people die.

▪ The how Challenges:

- How do we disarm cynicism?

- Divide realism/criticism from cynicism?

- Constructive communication

Words like no, not, don’t etc. will not register in the mind. Eg. Don’t hit the ball into the woods. The brain picks up ”ball” and ”woods” Everytime you say this you are reinforcing the the connection between ball and woods, instead of breaking it up. Use positive reinforcements, make positive connections.

You can choose you language, free yourself from habits and imprints.

Exercise: How does the mind affect physical strength?

Write down 3 things you like about yourself

Write down 3 things you dislike about yourself

The fasicilitor will pull down the arm of a person while first tellimg him/her the 3 things he/she likes about him/herself and then names the 3 dislikes. What do you think happens?

Exercise: What question can someone ask you that will make you want to connect with him/her?

E: Is that curiosity in your face?

Others Can I buy you a coffee?

From ideas to action:

Understand – imagine – create

Exercise: Go to the person you felt had the most important idea for development

▪ Renouncing/disarm cynicism

▪ Communicate learning & Be on the edge/risk taking

▪ Openhearted ▪ Being enthusiastic

▪ Connecting public and private

▪ Listening to as many voices as possible

Go and brainstorm for 15 min and write down more concrete and focused ideas. The result is more practical and opens the door for innovation. An idea will first have power when it is lived. Take it one step at the time.

Innovation – new things/concepts

Why do we act the way we do?

Past

Present

Future

Force

Fear

Politics

Environment

Belief

Religion

Money

Geography

Genes

Childhood

Hope

Expectations

Habit

Heart School

Effectiveness = What to do, how to do it and will to do it.

Imagine Chicago Lets imagine a city where >>insert dream<< Eg. Lets imagine a city where no ones life is wasted. Imagine God’s economy. What does that mean? Create a city of economy where no one is wasted. Everyone is essencially nessecary to the economy.

Week 38

Project Design

Peter Busch, Learning Zone, KP

Niko Grünferld, Development Zone KP

Dynamic Project Management By Nico Grünfeld

(telemark-skiing, coaching, fotball) ICF – international coaching federation - http://www.coachfederation.org/eweb/

Outcome: ▪ That you know how to start up a dynmic project ▪ That you can experiment with different models in your future workonesa re closed. ▪ Understand the DP-mindset (the KP-mindset)

Dialogue vs discussion Arguments, having right (hmm) vs. development mutual understanding

Questions and exercises ▪ What is my expectations for the lecture: What is dynamic project managements vs a more traditional approach, what windows are opened up to me and which

▪ What are our dreams: E.g Elisabeth New PC Develop painting Travel with Torfinn New shower Be certain of my ideas, my strengths and find environment to use them during and after school.

What is the purpose of telling our dreams? ▪ Create a positive mindset ▪ Be aware of what you want, what you are interested in,

What can dreams lead to? ▪ Happiness ▪ Boredom ▪ Potential ▪ Visions ▪ Hope

Think of this question in the break. What is to fulfill a dream? ▪ To create reality, shape reality ▪ To partake in reality, make it some of me ▪ Feeling of achievement

Questions written on a different board, somewhere else in the room. Spend 7 min to write the answers. ▪ Why are you here today? Interested Curious Hungry for knowledge See new solutions and perspectives

▪ What drives you in a project? The end result, but also the creation ▪ From what perspektive would you like to see the world from this week? Open minded Focus on my strengths ▪ What are you aiming to learn? See different solutions on how. Get concrete tools on how to lead, gjennomføre a project

▪ Why did we do this exercise? Be focused on what to get out the class

TEAM PERFORMANCE Who are you today? Why are you the way you the way are? Listen to the team players. What are the goals of the members? Be not only aware of the the goals and results, but also the process.

Team performance model Drexler/Sibbet – www.grove.com

1. Orientation – why are you here? 2. Trustbuilding – who are you? (Skills, but also hobbies) 3. Goals, visions, purpose – who are we? What do we want? = The preject 4. Commitment – Will we do it? 5. Implementation - Time and action plans (gannt charts, timetables) 6. High performance: Wow (if things goes smoothly, be the inspiration, aim higher, bring in new ideas) 7. Renewal/Future – what is next? (Do we need to reconsider, have times/society changed, what needs to be done to improve)

As a project manager don’t be afraid to say that we need breaks

▪ Why are you thoughts on this model?

▪ What is the consequenses of dropping the preject phase? Not unfold the potensial of you team members and raise the potential

Designing the alliance – create the context for the preject or for getting to know new people.

▪ What is the biggest difference between a traditional and dynamic project Goal-oriented vs vision-oriented project Symphony orchestra vs jam-session

▪ Turning visions/dreams into real-world realizations, instead of creating an overall vision for a real-world business.

▪ What is the energy in the room? Let people speak up. Blurt out.

PROJECT PHASES ▪ Preject – personal and project wise. ▪ Decisions platform:

▪ Goal setting phase (precision vs motivation – when describing the goal) ▪ Concept development phase (realism vs symbolism)

▪ Implication phase (management vs examination) ▪ Evaluation phase ()justification vs strategy/learning

PROJECT GUIDE Project and goal clarification 1. Title 2. Foreword 3. Need (Question #1 – Is there an internal and external needs?) 4. Background (Surroundings? Competitors? Market? Technology? Political signals?) 5. Idea (Basic idea? Story? What is the added value?) 6. Vision (Short power sentence – slogan?) 7. Purpose (Short term and long term achievements?) 8. Values (What values do we reflect? And are reflected?) 9. Principles (Underlying principles? Eg. The Kaospilot six values) 10. Dynamic process goal (What should we do? What are our goals?) 11. Team (Why am I here? Who are you? What do we want/need? Roles? Learning goals? Interested parties? Network? Competences? Challenges? Resources? CSC?) 12. Rules of the game (How do we want to communicate? Decision prosess?) 13. Project metaphor (A common picture on the project’s challenges/potensial/complexity?)

Creative concept development 14. Concept (Describe the concept in detail?) 15. Creativity 16. Dynamic time and action plan (Visualize the dynamic goal? Wha has to be done?) 17. Resources 18. Points of special attetion Methods

Implementation of dynamic goal 19. Script/follow up 20. Putting into perspective 21. Making the project visible 22. Reflection adn learning 23. Conclusion Methods

Main elements in a project ▪ Need – Idea – Vision/Purpose – Principles/Values – Concept – Team – Action

Game plan: Se gameplan.ai

▪ Idea vs Concept The idea of what you want to do. The concept is how you want to do it.

Week 39

Process Design

Toke Møller, Inter Change

Floris Koot, Development Zone KP

Open Space Process By Floris Koot

Agenda Welcome Shake body and head. Make bizarre statues both with and without sound. Check In Give a weather report, both with sound and physical mimic.

Rules of the Game Workshop 3 rounds in several different rooms. Presentation 1 min presentation of what happened in your space. Check Out Tombs up & point a gun at

Questions Why, what

Why an OS process? Why are we meeting? Have a clear and expressed purpose with the meeting. What do I need and what can I offer to strengthen our principles and purpose?

Rules of the Game 4 principles: Whoever comes are the right people Whatever happens is the only thing that could have happened It starts when it starts It is over when it is over

3 vital ingredients needed to let self-organization arise: A higher common purpose A willingness to work together A level of personal maturity and self mastery

Make an offer (write down a question/topic) you would like to discuss. Eg. Who is Team 12? We have all these conversations with the main purpose in the back of our head. 3 rounds: Lasting 25 min, 10 min, 30 min. Could be a day between each round and longer lasting rounds.

3 roles: The butterfly The bie The walker|

When is OS a good tool? Not controlling For a complex problems/challenges When people are not after a single solution When people are open to the process

www.openspaceworld.org


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Open Space Process By Floris Koot

Agenda Welcome Shake body and head. Make bizarre statues both with and without sound. Check In Give a weather report, both with sound and physical mimic.

Rules of the Game Workshop 3 rounds in several different rooms. Presentation 1 min presentation of what happened in your space. Check Out Tombs up & point a gun at

Questions Why, what

Why an OS process? Why are we meeting? Have a clear and expressed purpose with the meeting. What do I need and what can I offer to strengthen our principles and purpose?

Rules of the Game 4 principles: Whoever comes are the right people Whatever happens is the only thing that could have happened It starts when it starts It is over when it is over

3 vital ingredients needed to let self-organization arise: A higher common purpose A willingness to work together A level of personal maturity and self mastery

Make an offer (write down a question/topic) you would like to discuss. Eg. Who is Team 12? We have all these conversations with the main purpose in the back of our head. 3 rounds: Lasting 25 min, 10 min, 30 min. Could be a day between each round and longer lasting rounds.

3 roles: The butterfly The bie The walker|

When is OS a good tool? Not controlling For a complex problems/challenges When people are not after a single solution When people are open to the process

www.openspaceworld.org


/!\ Edit conflict - your version:



/!\ End of edit conflict


Kirstine Simoni og Jacob Paaske, Danish Youth Council

Goos Geuersen


/!\ Edit conflict - other version:


Visualization in processes By Goot Geursen

PART 1

Constellations – the purpose • Visual representation with of a problem • Unveiling group dynamic • Figuring out what is wrong, what is not working without asking. • Extending you level of consciousness to be more aware of the relations between people

The client The client is the person asking the question. The client is never part of the constellation in the beginning to see the system from the outside. The client can decide to partake in the system afterwards, directly.

The representatives The representatives are an anonymous group. The more detached the representatives are from the question and client, the purer the constellation.

The audience The audience is the people watching the constellation and its development.

The analysis Remember that the constellation only shows the clients truth, not necessarily the only truth. Talk about the revealed dynamics. Which representations were left out that could have been important in the constellation or which representations didn’t have the impact first thought.

PART 2

Be authentic • How to stat with yourself and be authentic • Be centered and grounded

Exercise 1: Place your thoughts in your head, your stomach and your feet. Let someone press your collarbone and press you backwards. Feel the difference when moving focus

Exercise 2: First let someone push your arm in an angle Then press your muscles to prevent the person from bending your arm Then imagine your arm as the hose and the water is flowing through your arm and to the garden.

Self 1 → Ego, judging self Self 2 → Natural self

Literature: The inner game of… by Timothy Galway (tennis player)

Exercise 3 - Guided fantasy: Grounded with your feet, on a chair Close your eyes Story told by a host Visualization of an ideal setting Exercise 4: Based on charka

Chakra Location Meaning 1st charka Sexual organ/anus Money, earth and nature, the basic grounding Root chakra 2nd charka Stomach area Playful charka Orange chakra 3rd charka Solar plexus Ego, self respect Solar Plexus chakra 4th charka Heart region Compassion Heart chakra 5th charka Throat Throat charka

Throat chakra 6th charka Between the eyes The third eye, the feel for the culture Brow chakra 7th charka Above your head Higher state of consciousness Crown charka

goos@bedryvigheden.nl

The Chaos Alliance, Lemmy Kook, Oufa Rian, Morten Ove

Dialogue, learning and listening By Lemmy Kook Jensen, Ouafa Rian, Morten Ove & Gry Guldberg

The KaosAlliance Heartcore Communication – Lemmy Kook Jensen Honesty (rhetoric) – Gry Guldberg Coherence – Morten Ove The Many Voices– Ouafa Rian

The KaosAlliance is a network fighting to develop leadership in emerging from coherence in complex systems.

Guiding principles Be present or be somewhere else Search for questions, not for answers Engage constructively with yourself, the others and us.

Hopes for the outcome of this day - What is rhetoric and what is honesty? Investigating the balance between manipulation and telling/doing the truth - Opening up to new and improved ways of communicating - Learn how to ask the good questions

Divide into 4 groups (Presence Coherence Complexity Honesty)

The Heart and Mind wall Exercise (morning, lunch, afternoon): Write down or illustrate a word describe the state of your heart and mind.

Lesson 1: Heartcore Communication - Why isn't everybody thinking like me? By Lemmy Kook Jensen

Dream Journey 1-2-3 Beach, Sun, The Earth, Forest Path Open spot Rock Glowing Diamond Clear feeling Evident perception There is something on your heart There is something you want to tell the world There is something you want to show the world Old man, Secret 1-2-3

When I was a student at the KaosPilots • People were always talking • People were always saying the same things again and again • Some people talked all the time, some were always quiet • How did we communicate? • Did we communicate? • What about coherence? • I often ask myself if we were present • Did we forget to nurse the connections? • Maybe there was a lack of "Stimmung"; we weren't tuned in; vibrations that didn't catch the same beat or pulse • But how come? We had the language; the word by mouth and we said a lot of words? • Did our brains cheat our hearts

Do we have to say something to communicate?

Exercise 1: How do we act without saying something? The voice is sounds Sound are vibrations But where are these vibrations coming from? From our mind or our heart?

I want you to count to ten, in chronological order, starting with 0 Everyone must say at least one number If two or more persons say the same number, you start all over again There must be no pattern in the way you execute the task.

So how do we communicate with the language? Where is communication anchored when we can't see the words?

Why this exercise: Be aware, and be present. Know when to listen and when to speak.

What is important when listening? The listener, the storyteller and the space between.

Exercise 2: How do we listen? The 4 levels of listening Level 1: We can listen with starting point in oneself Level 2: We can listen with interest (ask questions) Level 3: We can listen with our mind and our body (fully aware of the other person, her/his body language) Level 4: We can listen with the pit of our heart (seing what the other person is saying to me underneath it all)

Get together in pairs of two. Listen on level 1 Listen on level 2 Listen on level 3

What is listening about? How do we create an inner broadband for good listening? What is most important when we listen: Me? You? Us?

Exercise 3: Are we important enough to each other? In order to make to clear communication we must create coherence To create coherence we must connect In order to connect we must be so important to each other that we are being honest

So let's try to listen on level 4 Are we important enough for each other to be honest or to listen. Listen quietly for 1 min. Then rotate.

While you are listening try to sense how important the other person is to you. Find out what connects you Communicate what connects you to each other. Be honest.

How can coherence emerge? How do we nurse coherence? How do we strengthen your connections?

Exercise 4: How does it feel when you tell the world what's on your heart We can try to pretend that we are someone else that the person we are We can be busy running We can believe that we are independent people with no connections to the people around us We can get in sync with the person we are and fully act out this person We can be busy being present and honest We can believe that we are dependent on the people around us and connect in order to create coherence

Communicate what you want to tell and show the world

How did you feel? Where could you feel it? What happens if this feeling gets your starting point of communication?

Lesson 2: Body and Dialogue By Gry Guldberg

Learning goal: Be conscious about how you use your language and what impact your verbal actions have on you and the people around us. Any phrase expressed is a verbal action

Literature: Goffman (everyday theatre)

Big talk and small talk Big talk Say only what is necessary according to the goal of the conversation. Say only what you think is true. Don not say something you are not sure if you believe in. Be relevant, stick to the subject. Express yourself clearly and directly, without any possibility for misinterepretation.

Exercise: Where could a big talk be appropriate for team 12 (3 & 3) Make a list.

Simple talk (small talk) – the principle of politeness Take care of people around you. Avoid that your words increase people’s ability to act Be generous and fulfill other people’s need (or express that you want to fulfill them) Be positive. Avoid criticizing the one you are talking to. Support and express you sympathy instead. Be modest. Avoid telling about your advantages, reject kind words and be self critical. Agree. Seek common ground and avoid disagreement. Use phrasing like: Yes, but…

Exercise: When were you last polite to someone in team 12 (2 & 2)

Question: Do you see small talk as an advantage or disadvantage regarding leadership?

Exercise: What characteristics hide beneath these sentences? (2 & 2) 1. Hi John, wouldn’t you be nice and turn of the radio?

2. Ehh, John. Would you mind switching off the radio?

3. Wouldn’t it be nice to switch that radio off, John?

4. John! Would you switch that radio off?

5. Just switch that radio off, please

6. Just switch that radio off

7. Switch that radio off

8. Get that radio switched off!

9. Could you then get that radio switched off?

10. Go and get that radio switched off right away!

11. God damn! Get that radio switched off or I’ll…

Characteristics: Question Negation (not) Verbs in preteritum Adverbs that loosen up the sentence (just, kindly) Please, bitte, por favor etc

Indirect techniques of down-toning the expressed Example: Turning of the radio 1. What a day. I am completely tired (understated: please turn of the radio) 2. My work is quite difficult, I have to concentrate a lot. But I think you know that feeling. 3. Sorry, may I ask you something? Doesn’t that radio play louder than it use to? 4. Are you still listening to the radio, John? 5. Can you reach the button? I don’t feel like switching it off. 6. You would make me happy by switching off the radio. 7. Would you mind switching off the radio 8. Isn’t the radio able to play any louder? What about some more volume?

Interpretations 1-2: Talking about something else 3-4: Saying it in an indirect way. E.g. try to begin in a sympathetic way. 5-6: Informing how you would feel if the desired action happened. 7: Ask for the other’s opinion about the action 8: Use irony, jokes or non-transparent expressions

Face or fiasco – interaction between people The face is the positive and idealistic image of our own position and value one has of one self. One seeks to have this image confirmed by other people through their verbal actions and contact. This means your face is not a personal affair. You need to have your face confirmed by others. But at the same time they can destroy, interrupt and break down the face or mask you wear. You acknowledge and confirm a person’s presence through verbal actions, and are being confirmed and acknowledged through other people’s verbal actions.

Questions: When was your face last interrupted? Which verbal expressions can break down your face?

Exercise: (in plenum) When did you last lose your face? How did your body react when you lost your face?

Lesson 3: Reflection on process, communication and coherence By Morten Ove

(Entire lecture is giving without use of the voice, there is a powerpoint assisted by a second screen where Morten is writing all his thoughts in a notepad document as we go through the slides. He is talking personally to his audience through a simple text-editor, wirting down his immediate thoughts. Silence, music and live text – a live message)

Authenticity and communication Be real, be authentic, be yourself Communicating is interacting is relating is communicating is…

The Human Game (call your own bluff, change the game) Communicating without filters It is easy being just cool, the important subculture – I want to be accepted as I am, therefore I behave like someone else. But show your face – be real with me. Stop defending and start engaging Stop looking for the “right” answer, the right thing to do.

Me and Us Take the contribution to the world from your heart. There is no one like you, and no one, except you, can bring what you have. There is a live exchange (be real, be connected) – unlock potential by sharing, moving. The potential lies with US, not with YOU or ME.

Relational foundation for process makeup Relating is the foundation. You relate through openness (curiosity, inviting, welcoming) Honesty (being real, present). Are you important enough to me for me to be honest? Accountability (trust, counting on each other, integrity) Don’t say it, show it. Acceptance (Spacious personality, room for everyone, tolerance)

How to facilitate in relationships, engage in them? By getting dirty and heartcore Engage (words, intention, put yourself on the line) Heart to heart When to use the toolbox?

Be grounded | Be curious | Be together

Lesson 4: The Many Voices By Ouafa Rian

What perspective to create a space to contain a diversity of voices? Perspective – cognition

Behind every right and wrong there is a field. I will meet you there - J. Rumi (sufi)

Living systems (natural, social) Complexity, diversity, chaos, adaptive, non-linear and dynamic systems. Constantly in a balance between chaos and order.

Def. chaos: Unpredictable, but not random

Tool # 1 - Negotiation

The world does not exist, it is constantly being brought forth by negotiation. (The foundation of systemic thinking)

Understanding is a form of control Every answer is a death – John Cage

Gry Guldberg, Development Zone KP

Body and Dialogue By Gry Guldberg

Learning goal: Be conscious about how you use your language and what impact your verbal actions have on you and the people around us. Any phrase expressed is a verbal action

Literature: Goffman (everyday theatre)

Big talk and simple talk (I refuse to use small talk) Big talk Say only what is necessary according to the goal of the conversation. Say only what you think is true. Don not say something you are not sure if you believe in. Be relevant, stick to the subject. Express yourself clearly and directly, without any possibility for misinterepretation.

Exercise: Where could a big talk be appropriate for team 12 (3 & 3) Make a list.

Simple talk (small talk) – the principle of politeness Take care of people around you. Avoid that your words increase people’s ability to act Be generous and fulfill other people’s need (or express that you want to fulfill them) Be positive. Avoid criticizing the one you are talking to. Support and express you sympathy instead. Be modest. Avoid telling about your advantages, reject kind words and be self critical. Agree. Seek common ground and avoid disagreement. Use phrasing like: Yes, but…

Exercise: When were you last polite to someone in team 12 (2 & 2)

Question: Do you see small talk as an advantage or disadvantage regarding leadership?

Exercise: What characteristics hide beneath these sentences? (2 & 2) 1. Hi John, wouldn’t you be nice and turn of the radio?

2. Ehh, John. Would you mind switching off the radio?

3. Wouldn’t it be nice to switch that radio off, John?

4. John! Would you switch that radio off?

5. Just switch that radio off, please

6. Just switch that radio off

7. Switch that radio off

8. Get that radio switched off!

9. Could you then get that radio switched off?

10. Go and get that radio switched off right away!

11. God damn! Get that radio switched off or I’ll…

Characteristics: Question Negation (not) Verbs in preteritum Adverbs that loosen up the sentence (just, kindly) Please, bitte, por favor etc

Indirect techniques of down-toning the expressed Example: Turning of the radio 1. What a day. I am completely tired (understated: please turn of the radio) 2. My work is quite difficult, I have to concentrate a lot. But I think you know that feeling. 3. Sorry, may I ask you something? Doesn’t that radio play louder than it use to? 4. Are you still listening to the radio, John? 5. Can you reach the button? I don’t feel like switching it off. 6. You would make me happy by switching off the radio. 7. Would you mind switching off the radio 8. Isn’t the radio able to play any louder? What about some more volume?

Interpretations 1-2: Talking about something else 3-4: Saying it in an indirect way. E.g. try to begin in a sympathetic way. 5-6: Informing how you would feel if the desired action happened. 7: Ask for the other’s opinion about the action 8: Use irony, jokes or non-transparent expressions

Face or fiasco – interaction between people The face is the positive and idealistic image of our own position and value one has of one self. One seeks to have this image confirmed by other people through their verbal actions and contact. This means your face is not a personal affair. You need to have your face confirmed by others. But at the same time they can destroy, interrupt and break down the face or mask you wear. You acknowledge and confirm a person’s presence through verbal actions, and are being confirmed and acknowledged through other people’s verbal actions.

Questions: When was your face last interrupted? Which verbal expressions can break down your face?

Exercise: (in plenum) When did you last lose your face? How did your body react when you lost your face?

Mick Cordero and Jonas Lidman, KP Team 10

Forum theatre By Mick and Thomas (team 10)

Agenda 09:00 Welcome

12:00 Lunch 13.00 Choose the themes for the forum theatre

16:00 End

Exercises in focus and concentration Exercise 1: Passing you name on. When you meet someone stretch out your right hand tell them your first name. You get a name in return. This is your new name, take it and pass it on to the next person you meet. When you get your own name back, step out of the group. (If you want a harder challenge you can stretch out your left hand and give away your last name when you get your own name back)

Exercise 2: Here we come & show me who you are Divide into two groups. Both group get a theme from a category (a meal, an artist, a country etc.) Each group get 10 seconds to decide on what the concrete theme should be and how to mime it. The groups stand in front of each other. Group one takes 3 steps (saying: Here we come x 3), group 2 stops them (saying: Stop! Show me who you are) and then group 1 have to mime their theme. When group 2 guess the theme, it is up to group 1 to get back to the starting point without getting caught. Anyone who does is not part of the other group. Repeat until you loose interest ☺

What is a process? A development you are focused on People moving from one place to another (Ketan) Take a theatre, everything happening backstage or behind the scene is the process (Kristin) Classical def: The movement from A to B

NB: In order to have a project, it must be limited in time and space and it must have an outcome. Time tables and milestones etc.

Process: Why are we doing this? How are we going to work together? Are we conscious about the process during the project?

Top 5 (last week for Elisabeth) - Constellation – visual representations - Listening exercise (Lemmy) - Communication is everywhere/everything - Be true to yourself, be real - How to keep the overview when involved in a process. It is often more difficult to reflect when in the middle of everything.

Wishing list (What do we want to learn?) - Involvement versus overview - Case studies - Implementing tools (embody the tools) - How to treasure the results/outcome of the workshop?

Tip Ask questions for the group to answer Draw drawing resembling the situation Change perspective (How does X feel, how does Y feel) Always end with an evaluation

NB: Shut up - fruit

Exercise in observation 10 people are sent out of the room. They are given a specific scenario they are exposed to and should respond to when re-entering the room they left.

The rest will observe the 10 people when they re-enter the room. Observe without judgement (describe without judgement)

Do the observation group manage to decipher where the 10 people are?

Simple version: It is muted, there is no specific task for the actors to perform, and there is no cooperation.

Conclusion: The leap from observation to judgement is a short one.

Exercise in values Agree/Disagree/Not sure You have these 3 different answer to give to the following statements. When hearing a statement you move to the corner of the room that represent the your opinion. You are allowed to change your opinion at any time. When the groups are set, they discuss why they have choose the opinion they have and the facilitator ask a representative to share the groups thoughts. Statements: Autumn is the best season

Forum theatre and forum play

Created in 1950-60 by Director Boal. He was working with plays that had no ending and rather letting the audience decide what should happen, and even partake in the process on stage. The purpose was to transform the audience. Boal worked with a Swedish woman Byrens. A famous quote from her is: Be the main character in your own life”

Difference between forum and play Theatre: Prepared parts where som may influence or even partake in the piece Play: The group in total decide the focus/content of the piece

Forum play Purpose: Show/play out a conflict or challenge to generate the possibility of recognition.

The piece must have the following ingredients: - Relevance to the audience - A problem owner - A problem solver

Reflections + You see the problems on a distance, as an audience + The power of recognition + There is no magical answer, no single solution - Not realistic, as it is very difficult to find a relevant solution - People get stuck in their roles

How to alter the situation/end the conflict in the play? You can include physical alterations (shouts, carrying a person) Change the actor to let someone else play the role differently Make people talk clearly, no in each others mouths. Make people be less verbal and more physical


/!\ Edit conflict - your version:


Visualization in processes By Goot Geursen

PART 1

Constellations – the purpose • Visual representation with of a problem • Unveiling group dynamic • Figuring out what is wrong, what is not working without asking. • Extending you level of consciousness to be more aware of the relations between people

The client The client is the person asking the question. The client is never part of the constellation in the beginning to see the system from the outside. The client can decide to partake in the system afterwards, directly.

The representatives The representatives are an anonymous group. The more detached the representatives are from the question and client, the purer the constellation.

The audience The audience is the people watching the constellation and its development.

The analysis Remember that the constellation only shows the clients truth, not necessarily the only truth. Talk about the revealed dynamics. Which representations were left out that could have been important in the constellation or which representations didn’t have the impact first thought.

PART 2

Be authentic • How to stat with yourself and be authentic • Be centered and grounded

Exercise 1: Place your thoughts in your head, your stomach and your feet. Let someone press your collarbone and press you backwards. Feel the difference when moving focus

Exercise 2: First let someone push your arm in an angle Then press your muscles to prevent the person from bending your arm Then imagine your arm as the hose and the water is flowing through your arm and to the garden.

Self 1 → Ego, judging self Self 2 → Natural self

Literature: The inner game of… by Timothy Galway (tennis player)

Exercise 3 - Guided fantasy: Grounded with your feet, on a chair Close your eyes Story told by a host Visualization of an ideal setting Exercise 4: Based on charka

Chakra Location Meaning 1st charka Sexual organ/anus Money, earth and nature, the basic grounding Root chakra 2nd charka Stomach area Playful charka Orange chakra 3rd charka Solar plexus Ego, self respect Solar Plexus chakra 4th charka Heart region Compassion Heart chakra 5th charka Throat Throat charka

Throat chakra 6th charka Between the eyes The third eye, the feel for the culture Brow chakra 7th charka Above your head Higher state of consciousness Crown charka

goos@bedryvigheden.nl

The Chaos Alliance, Lemmy Kook, Oufa Rian, Morten Ove

Dialogue, learning and listening By Lemmy Kook Jensen, Ouafa Rian, Morten Ove & Gry Guldberg

The KaosAlliance Heartcore Communication – Lemmy Kook Jensen Honesty (rhetoric) – Gry Guldberg Coherence – Morten Ove The Many Voices– Ouafa Rian

The KaosAlliance is a network fighting to develop leadership in emerging from coherence in complex systems.

Guiding principles Be present or be somewhere else Search for questions, not for answers Engage constructively with yourself, the others and us.

Hopes for the outcome of this day - What is rhetoric and what is honesty? Investigating the balance between manipulation and telling/doing the truth - Opening up to new and improved ways of communicating - Learn how to ask the good questions

Divide into 4 groups (Presence Coherence Complexity Honesty)

The Heart and Mind wall Exercise (morning, lunch, afternoon): Write down or illustrate a word describe the state of your heart and mind.

Lesson 1: Heartcore Communication - Why isn't everybody thinking like me? By Lemmy Kook Jensen

Dream Journey 1-2-3 Beach, Sun, The Earth, Forest Path Open spot Rock Glowing Diamond Clear feeling Evident perception There is something on your heart There is something you want to tell the world There is something you want to show the world Old man, Secret 1-2-3

When I was a student at the KaosPilots • People were always talking • People were always saying the same things again and again • Some people talked all the time, some were always quiet • How did we communicate? • Did we communicate? • What about coherence? • I often ask myself if we were present • Did we forget to nurse the connections? • Maybe there was a lack of "Stimmung"; we weren't tuned in; vibrations that didn't catch the same beat or pulse • But how come? We had the language; the word by mouth and we said a lot of words? • Did our brains cheat our hearts

Do we have to say something to communicate?

Exercise 1: How do we act without saying something? The voice is sounds Sound are vibrations But where are these vibrations coming from? From our mind or our heart?

I want you to count to ten, in chronological order, starting with 0 Everyone must say at least one number If two or more persons say the same number, you start all over again There must be no pattern in the way you execute the task.

So how do we communicate with the language? Where is communication anchored when we can't see the words?

Why this exercise: Be aware, and be present. Know when to listen and when to speak.

What is important when listening? The listener, the storyteller and the space between.

Exercise 2: How do we listen? The 4 levels of listening Level 1: We can listen with starting point in oneself Level 2: We can listen with interest (ask questions) Level 3: We can listen with our mind and our body (fully aware of the other person, her/his body language) Level 4: We can listen with the pit of our heart (seing what the other person is saying to me underneath it all)

Get together in pairs of two. Listen on level 1 Listen on level 2 Listen on level 3

What is listening about? How do we create an inner broadband for good listening? What is most important when we listen: Me? You? Us?

Exercise 3: Are we important enough to each other? In order to make to clear communication we must create coherence To create coherence we must connect In order to connect we must be so important to each other that we are being honest

So let's try to listen on level 4 Are we important enough for each other to be honest or to listen. Listen quietly for 1 min. Then rotate.

While you are listening try to sense how important the other person is to you. Find out what connects you Communicate what connects you to each other. Be honest.

How can coherence emerge? How do we nurse coherence? How do we strengthen your connections?

Exercise 4: How does it feel when you tell the world what's on your heart We can try to pretend that we are someone else that the person we are We can be busy running We can believe that we are independent people with no connections to the people around us We can get in sync with the person we are and fully act out this person We can be busy being present and honest We can believe that we are dependent on the people around us and connect in order to create coherence

Communicate what you want to tell and show the world

How did you feel? Where could you feel it? What happens if this feeling gets your starting point of communication?

Lesson 2: Body and Dialogue By Gry Guldberg

Learning goal: Be conscious about how you use your language and what impact your verbal actions have on you and the people around us. Any phrase expressed is a verbal action

Literature: Goffman (everyday theatre)

Big talk and small talk Big talk Say only what is necessary according to the goal of the conversation. Say only what you think is true. Don not say something you are not sure if you believe in. Be relevant, stick to the subject. Express yourself clearly and directly, without any possibility for misinterepretation.

Exercise: Where could a big talk be appropriate for team 12 (3 & 3) Make a list.

Simple talk (small talk) – the principle of politeness Take care of people around you. Avoid that your words increase people’s ability to act Be generous and fulfill other people’s need (or express that you want to fulfill them) Be positive. Avoid criticizing the one you are talking to. Support and express you sympathy instead. Be modest. Avoid telling about your advantages, reject kind words and be self critical. Agree. Seek common ground and avoid disagreement. Use phrasing like: Yes, but…

Exercise: When were you last polite to someone in team 12 (2 & 2)

Question: Do you see small talk as an advantage or disadvantage regarding leadership?

Exercise: What characteristics hide beneath these sentences? (2 & 2) 1. Hi John, wouldn’t you be nice and turn of the radio?

2. Ehh, John. Would you mind switching off the radio?

3. Wouldn’t it be nice to switch that radio off, John?

4. John! Would you switch that radio off?

5. Just switch that radio off, please

6. Just switch that radio off

7. Switch that radio off

8. Get that radio switched off!

9. Could you then get that radio switched off?

10. Go and get that radio switched off right away!

11. God damn! Get that radio switched off or I’ll…

Characteristics: Question Negation (not) Verbs in preteritum Adverbs that loosen up the sentence (just, kindly) Please, bitte, por favor etc

Indirect techniques of down-toning the expressed Example: Turning of the radio 1. What a day. I am completely tired (understated: please turn of the radio) 2. My work is quite difficult, I have to concentrate a lot. But I think you know that feeling. 3. Sorry, may I ask you something? Doesn’t that radio play louder than it use to? 4. Are you still listening to the radio, John? 5. Can you reach the button? I don’t feel like switching it off. 6. You would make me happy by switching off the radio. 7. Would you mind switching off the radio 8. Isn’t the radio able to play any louder? What about some more volume?

Interpretations 1-2: Talking about something else 3-4: Saying it in an indirect way. E.g. try to begin in a sympathetic way. 5-6: Informing how you would feel if the desired action happened. 7: Ask for the other’s opinion about the action 8: Use irony, jokes or non-transparent expressions

Face or fiasco – interaction between people The face is the positive and idealistic image of our own position and value one has of one self. One seeks to have this image confirmed by other people through their verbal actions and contact. This means your face is not a personal affair. You need to have your face confirmed by others. But at the same time they can destroy, interrupt and break down the face or mask you wear. You acknowledge and confirm a person’s presence through verbal actions, and are being confirmed and acknowledged through other people’s verbal actions.

Questions: When was your face last interrupted? Which verbal expressions can break down your face?

Exercise: (in plenum) When did you last lose your face? How did your body react when you lost your face?

Lesson 3: Reflection on process, communication and coherence By Morten Ove

(Entire lecture is giving without use of the voice, there is a powerpoint assisted by a second screen where Morten is writing all his thoughts in a notepad document as we go through the slides. He is talking personally to his audience through a simple text-editor, wirting down his immediate thoughts. Silence, music and live text – a live message)

Authenticity and communication Be real, be authentic, be yourself Communicating is interacting is relating is communicating is…

The Human Game (call your own bluff, change the game) Communicating without filters It is easy being just cool, the important subculture – I want to be accepted as I am, therefore I behave like someone else. But show your face – be real with me. Stop defending and start engaging Stop looking for the “right” answer, the right thing to do.

Me and Us Take the contribution to the world from your heart. There is no one like you, and no one, except you, can bring what you have. There is a live exchange (be real, be connected) – unlock potential by sharing, moving. The potential lies with US, not with YOU or ME.

Relational foundation for process makeup Relating is the foundation. You relate through openness (curiosity, inviting, welcoming) Honesty (being real, present). Are you important enough to me for me to be honest? Accountability (trust, counting on each other, integrity) Don’t say it, show it. Acceptance (Spacious personality, room for everyone, tolerance)

How to facilitate in relationships, engage in them? By getting dirty and heartcore Engage (words, intention, put yourself on the line) Heart to heart When to use the toolbox?

Be grounded | Be curious | Be together

Lesson 4: The Many Voices By Ouafa Rian

What perspective to create a space to contain a diversity of voices? Perspective – cognition

Behind every right and wrong there is a field. I will meet you there - J. Rumi (sufi)

Living systems (natural, social) Complexity, diversity, chaos, adaptive, non-linear and dynamic systems. Constantly in a balance between chaos and order.

Def. chaos: Unpredictable, but not random

Tool # 1 - Negotiation

The world does not exist, it is constantly being brought forth by negotiation. (The foundation of systemic thinking)

Understanding is a form of control Every answer is a death – John Cage

Gry Guldberg, Development Zone KP

Body and Dialogue By Gry Guldberg

Learning goal: Be conscious about how you use your language and what impact your verbal actions have on you and the people around us. Any phrase expressed is a verbal action

Literature: Goffman (everyday theatre)

Big talk and simple talk (I refuse to use small talk) Big talk Say only what is necessary according to the goal of the conversation. Say only what you think is true. Don not say something you are not sure if you believe in. Be relevant, stick to the subject. Express yourself clearly and directly, without any possibility for misinterepretation.

Exercise: Where could a big talk be appropriate for team 12 (3 & 3) Make a list.

Simple talk (small talk) – the principle of politeness Take care of people around you. Avoid that your words increase people’s ability to act Be generous and fulfill other people’s need (or express that you want to fulfill them) Be positive. Avoid criticizing the one you are talking to. Support and express you sympathy instead. Be modest. Avoid telling about your advantages, reject kind words and be self critical. Agree. Seek common ground and avoid disagreement. Use phrasing like: Yes, but…

Exercise: When were you last polite to someone in team 12 (2 & 2)

Question: Do you see small talk as an advantage or disadvantage regarding leadership?

Exercise: What characteristics hide beneath these sentences? (2 & 2) 1. Hi John, wouldn’t you be nice and turn of the radio?

2. Ehh, John. Would you mind switching off the radio?

3. Wouldn’t it be nice to switch that radio off, John?

4. John! Would you switch that radio off?

5. Just switch that radio off, please

6. Just switch that radio off

7. Switch that radio off

8. Get that radio switched off!

9. Could you then get that radio switched off?

10. Go and get that radio switched off right away!

11. God damn! Get that radio switched off or I’ll…

Characteristics: Question Negation (not) Verbs in preteritum Adverbs that loosen up the sentence (just, kindly) Please, bitte, por favor etc

Indirect techniques of down-toning the expressed Example: Turning of the radio 1. What a day. I am completely tired (understated: please turn of the radio) 2. My work is quite difficult, I have to concentrate a lot. But I think you know that feeling. 3. Sorry, may I ask you something? Doesn’t that radio play louder than it use to? 4. Are you still listening to the radio, John? 5. Can you reach the button? I don’t feel like switching it off. 6. You would make me happy by switching off the radio. 7. Would you mind switching off the radio 8. Isn’t the radio able to play any louder? What about some more volume?

Interpretations 1-2: Talking about something else 3-4: Saying it in an indirect way. E.g. try to begin in a sympathetic way. 5-6: Informing how you would feel if the desired action happened. 7: Ask for the other’s opinion about the action 8: Use irony, jokes or non-transparent expressions

Face or fiasco – interaction between people The face is the positive and idealistic image of our own position and value one has of one self. One seeks to have this image confirmed by other people through their verbal actions and contact. This means your face is not a personal affair. You need to have your face confirmed by others. But at the same time they can destroy, interrupt and break down the face or mask you wear. You acknowledge and confirm a person’s presence through verbal actions, and are being confirmed and acknowledged through other people’s verbal actions.

Questions: When was your face last interrupted? Which verbal expressions can break down your face?

Exercise: (in plenum) When did you last lose your face? How did your body react when you lost your face?

Mick Cordero and Jonas Lidman, KP Team 10

Forum theatre By Mick and Thomas (team 10)

Agenda 09:00 Welcome

12:00 Lunch 13.00 Choose the themes for the forum theatre

16:00 End

Exercises in focus and concentration Exercise 1: Passing you name on. When you meet someone stretch out your right hand tell them your first name. You get a name in return. This is your new name, take it and pass it on to the next person you meet. When you get your own name back, step out of the group. (If you want a harder challenge you can stretch out your left hand and give away your last name when you get your own name back)

Exercise 2: Here we come & show me who you are Divide into two groups. Both group get a theme from a category (a meal, an artist, a country etc.) Each group get 10 seconds to decide on what the concrete theme should be and how to mime it. The groups stand in front of each other. Group one takes 3 steps (saying: Here we come x 3), group 2 stops them (saying: Stop! Show me who you are) and then group 1 have to mime their theme. When group 2 guess the theme, it is up to group 1 to get back to the starting point without getting caught. Anyone who does is not part of the other group. Repeat until you loose interest ☺

What is a process? A development you are focused on People moving from one place to another (Ketan) Take a theatre, everything happening backstage or behind the scene is the process (Kristin) Classical def: The movement from A to B

NB: In order to have a project, it must be limited in time and space and it must have an outcome. Time tables and milestones etc.

Process: Why are we doing this? How are we going to work together? Are we conscious about the process during the project?

Top 5 (last week for Elisabeth) - Constellation – visual representations - Listening exercise (Lemmy) - Communication is everywhere/everything - Be true to yourself, be real - How to keep the overview when involved in a process. It is often more difficult to reflect when in the middle of everything.

Wishing list (What do we want to learn?) - Involvement versus overview - Case studies - Implementing tools (embody the tools) - How to treasure the results/outcome of the workshop?

Tip Ask questions for the group to answer Draw drawing resembling the situation Change perspective (How does X feel, how does Y feel) Always end with an evaluation

NB: Shut up - fruit

Exercise in observation 10 people are sent out of the room. They are given a specific scenario they are exposed to and should respond to when re-entering the room they left.

The rest will observe the 10 people when they re-enter the room. Observe without judgement (describe without judgement)

Do the observation group manage to decipher where the 10 people are?

Simple version: It is muted, there is no specific task for the actors to perform, and there is no cooperation.

Conclusion: The leap from observation to judgement is a short one.

Exercise in values Agree/Disagree/Not sure You have these 3 different answer to give to the following statements. When hearing a statement you move to the corner of the room that represent the your opinion. You are allowed to change your opinion at any time. When the groups are set, they discuss why they have choose the opinion they have and the facilitator ask a representative to share the groups thoughts. Statements: Autumn is the best season

Forum theatre and forum play

Created in 1950-60 by Director Boal. He was working with plays that had no ending and rather letting the audience decide what should happen, and even partake in the process on stage. The purpose was to transform the audience. Boal worked with a Swedish woman Byrens. A famous quote from her is: Be the main character in your own life”

Difference between forum and play Theatre: Prepared parts where som may influence or even partake in the piece Play: The group in total decide the focus/content of the piece

Forum play Purpose: Show/play out a conflict or challenge to generate the possibility of recognition.

The piece must have the following ingredients: - Relevance to the audience - A problem owner - A problem solver

Reflections + You see the problems on a distance, as an audience + The power of recognition + There is no magical answer, no single solution - Not realistic, as it is very difficult to find a relevant solution - People get stuck in their roles

How to alter the situation/end the conflict in the play? You can include physical alterations (shouts, carrying a person) Change the actor to let someone else play the role differently Make people talk clearly, no in each others mouths. Make people be less verbal and more physical


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Week 40

Sharpen your senses

Janne Vind

Gry Guldberg, Learning Zone KP

Rhetorics By Gry Guldberg

Introduction – clarification of the subject Exercise 1: Walk and Talk (2 & 2) Decide a subject for a 7 min presentation: American Comics, Vertigo Exercise 2: Describe the subject (2 & 2)

Why do you find this subject interesting?

Do you have a specific knowledge about the subject?

Do you have feelings for the subject?

Formulate how it was when you first came close to this subject.

What will your presentation of the subject contribute to your audience?

  1. They will gain knowledge of a wider variety of comics
  2. The will see the difference between classical and a newer type of comics
  3. It might produce more readers of comics.

Formulate why you burn for this subject.

What are the ingredients of a good presentation? Reflections • Personal involvement • Passion • Enlightenment • Well-prepared • Knowledge • Knowing the audience – do research • Focus on theme of subject • Know you given time • Voice (not monotone) • Eye contact • Body language (no fiddling with your hands, move around the room, be grounded and have good posture) • Tell the story in co-operation with your body • Humor • Variation • Joy • Small, catchy phrase

The Rhetorical Compass Past: The Rhetorical Pentagram (Cicero) Now: The Rhetorical Compass (the Audience in the centre and 8 aspects)

The Audience Exercise 3: Who is my audience? (3 & 3) Who are they?

Do they have a certain interest on beforehand?

What do they know and what don’t they know?

What should the audience know as a minimum after the presentation?

Are they positive, negative or neutral towards you and the organization you represent?

What makes a person reliable/credible? Use of source material Authority - intimidation No contradictions – coherence Reputation Fear

Credibility of the sender – the different ethos The Initial Ethos Stereotypes Sponsorship effect Namedropping

The Derived Ethos It might change the initial ethos, so that you either loose or raise you ethos.

How to raise you ethos: Read your audience (Give break, change) Substantiate your arguments form reliable sources Present your information in a reliable and in a way to get solidarity.

Create a common ground and goodwill in the audience

Be aware of the use of difficult or professional words. Be well prepared – have a fluent presentation. Use facts and references, if quotes, take them from reliable sources.

The Terminal Ethos Today’s terminal ethos is tomorrow’s initial ethos

Exercise 4: My ethos: What would I want my terminal ethos to be? (2 & 2) Competent

Fascinating

Making an impact Interesting

Knowledgeable

Engaging

Communicative

How do I prepare myself to get that terminal ethos?

Elements and methods of a good presentation Docere: To inform, to teach (the intellectual level) Delectare: To please, to entertain (the aesthetic level) Movere: To touch, to change behaviour (the emotional level)

Exordium - the beginning Rhetorical effects in the exordium

Corpus - the middle Rhetorical effects in the corpus:

Peroratio - the ending Rhetorical effects in the peroration:

My exordium Exercise 5: How do I present the exordium (individually) Myself

Subject

Structure

Duration

Why should the audience listen

Make a sentence that creates a common ground and goodwill between you and your audience. Make a short appetizer to get the attention of the audience. Formulate your main point (propositio) in a way relating to your audience.

The five rhetorical duties Officia oraoris – the speaker duties (according to Aristoteles) INVENTIO - get ideas and do research.

DISPOSITIO

ELUCOTIO - the style of speech

MEMORIA

ACTIO

Constructive feedback Rules of conduction Constructive feedback is Careful, Concrete and Constructive Encourage the strength! Constructive feedback is a response to – and a respect to – the speakers efforts

Constructive feedback A way to develop both the professional and personal The communication is symmetric

A gift

Exercise 6: 1 min to present the exordium (Individually with feedback) (see the feedback summery at the end of the document: My presentation - feedback)

Visual and aural observations of the presentation: Listen to the voice Observe the body language (postures, movements, mimics and gestures)

A clear focus My Focus Why should the audience listen to me? What purpose do I have for my presentation?

Who is my audience?

Exercise 7: Formulate you focus in one sentence (3 & 3) • I would like to inform the audience about another type of comics, to let them know there are alternatives to the traditional comics. • Comics are not only for kids, there is a whole genre out there directed at a mature reader. • Challenge the notion that comics are made for kids or teenagers.

Stage fright – communication apprehension Be mentally well prepared – find your balance Be well prepared subject wise Remember that the majority of your audience admire your courage Practice a lot before entering the stage Warm up your voice Take several deep breaths before entering the stage to relax your muscles Use an audience involving procedure in the beginning.

My personal preparation Exercise 8: How to minimize my stage fright? (2 & 2) How do I prepare myself:

My personal structure Selection Kill your darlings

Kipling’s Method (higher editing)

Weighting Order Importance Chronology Logic Stairs of abstraction – go from simple and concrete to more abstract information

Exercise 9: My personal structure (individually) Exercise 10: My personal structure (1.5 min presentation, 9 & 9)

My peroration Exercise 11: My peroration (2 & 2) What should your audience remember from your presentation?

  1. Vertigo
  2. A new type pf comics
  3. Sandman, Hellblazer

Do you want your audience to act? How? Describe it.

Formulate the end of your presentation.

Script Techniques for memorizing

Advantages Be confident with your script – you gain a lot of advantages in the communication situation

My presentation - feedback

First presentation: 1,5 min – only the exordium + Well structured + Created a common ground + Good details + Good use of abstraction and concreteness + Good at making people relate to you subject + Engaging + Competent (you know your subject) + Good intonation + Great body language! Smile! Eyes! Lovely.

- Work on breathing techniques to ground yourself, listen to your body - Tone down moving on the floorm watch your steps and feet. - Rather mention than explain in the exordium - Form of preseantion?

Final presentation: 7 min Exordium

End

Visual

Body language

Voice

From Gry:


/!\ Edit conflict - other version:


Rhetorics By Gry Guldberg

Introduction – clarification of the subject Exercise 1: Walk and Talk (2 & 2) Decide a subject for a 7 min presentation: American Comics, Vertigo Exercise 2: Describe the subject (2 & 2)

Why do you find this subject interesting?

Do you have a specific knowledge about the subject?

Do you have feelings for the subject?

Formulate how it was when you first came close to this subject.

What will your presentation of the subject contribute to your audience?

  1. They will gain knowledge of a wider variety of comics
  2. The will see the difference between classical and a newer type of comics
  3. It might produce more readers of comics.

Formulate why you burn for this subject.

What are the ingredients of a good presentation? Reflections • Personal involvement • Passion • Enlightenment • Well-prepared • Knowledge • Knowing the audience – do research • Focus on theme of subject • Know you given time • Voice (not monotone) • Eye contact • Body language (no fiddling with your hands, move around the room, be grounded and have good posture) • Tell the story in co-operation with your body • Humor • Variation • Joy • Small, catchy phrase

The Rhetorical Compass Past: The Rhetorical Pentagram (Cicero) Now: The Rhetorical Compass (the Audience in the centre and 8 aspects)

The Audience Exercise 3: Who is my audience? (3 & 3) Who are they?

Do they have a certain interest on beforehand?

What do they know and what don’t they know?

What should the audience know as a minimum after the presentation?

Are they positive, negative or neutral towards you and the organization you represent?

What makes a person reliable/credible? Use of source material Authority - intimidation No contradictions – coherence Reputation Fear

Credibility of the sender – the different ethos The Initial Ethos Stereotypes Sponsorship effect Namedropping

The Derived Ethos It might change the initial ethos, so that you either loose or raise you ethos.

How to raise you ethos: Read your audience (Give break, change) Substantiate your arguments form reliable sources Present your information in a reliable and in a way to get solidarity.

Create a common ground and goodwill in the audience

Be aware of the use of difficult or professional words. Be well prepared – have a fluent presentation. Use facts and references, if quotes, take them from reliable sources.

The Terminal Ethos Today’s terminal ethos is tomorrow’s initial ethos

Exercise 4: My ethos: What would I want my terminal ethos to be? (2 & 2) Competent

Fascinating

Making an impact Interesting

Knowledgeable

Engaging

Communicative

How do I prepare myself to get that terminal ethos?

Elements and methods of a good presentation Docere: To inform, to teach (the intellectual level) Delectare: To please, to entertain (the aesthetic level) Movere: To touch, to change behaviour (the emotional level)

Exordium - the beginning Rhetorical effects in the exordium

Corpus - the middle Rhetorical effects in the corpus:

Peroratio - the ending Rhetorical effects in the peroration:

My exordium Exercise 5: How do I present the exordium (individually) Myself

Subject

Structure

Duration

Why should the audience listen

Make a sentence that creates a common ground and goodwill between you and your audience. Make a short appetizer to get the attention of the audience. Formulate your main point (propositio) in a way relating to your audience.

The five rhetorical duties Officia oraoris – the speaker duties (according to Aristoteles) INVENTIO - get ideas and do research.

DISPOSITIO

ELUCOTIO - the style of speech

MEMORIA

ACTIO

Constructive feedback Rules of conduction Constructive feedback is Careful, Concrete and Constructive Encourage the strength! Constructive feedback is a response to – and a respect to – the speakers efforts

Constructive feedback A way to develop both the professional and personal The communication is symmetric

A gift

Exercise 6: 1 min to present the exordium (Individually with feedback) (see the feedback summery at the end of the document: My presentation - feedback)

Visual and aural observations of the presentation: Listen to the voice Observe the body language (postures, movements, mimics and gestures)

A clear focus My Focus Why should the audience listen to me? What purpose do I have for my presentation?

Who is my audience?

Exercise 7: Formulate you focus in one sentence (3 & 3) • I would like to inform the audience about another type of comics, to let them know there are alternatives to the traditional comics. • Comics are not only for kids, there is a whole genre out there directed at a mature reader. • Challenge the notion that comics are made for kids or teenagers.

Stage fright – communication apprehension Be mentally well prepared – find your balance Be well prepared subject wise Remember that the majority of your audience admire your courage Practice a lot before entering the stage Warm up your voice Take several deep breaths before entering the stage to relax your muscles Use an audience involving procedure in the beginning.

My personal preparation Exercise 8: How to minimize my stage fright? (2 & 2) How do I prepare myself:

My personal structure Selection Kill your darlings

Kipling’s Method (higher editing)

Weighting Order Importance Chronology Logic Stairs of abstraction – go from simple and concrete to more abstract information

Exercise 9: My personal structure (individually) Exercise 10: My personal structure (1.5 min presentation, 9 & 9)

My peroration Exercise 11: My peroration (2 & 2) What should your audience remember from your presentation?

  1. Vertigo
  2. A new type pf comics
  3. Sandman, Hellblazer

Do you want your audience to act? How? Describe it.

Formulate the end of your presentation.

Script Techniques for memorizing

Advantages Be confident with your script – you gain a lot of advantages in the communication situation

My presentation - feedback

First presentation: 1,5 min – only the exordium + Well structured + Created a common ground + Good details + Good use of abstraction and concreteness + Good at making people relate to you subject + Engaging + Competent (you know your subject) + Good intonation + Great body language! Smile! Eyes! Lovely.

- Work on breathing techniques to ground yourself, listen to your body - Tone down moving on the floorm watch your steps and feet. - Rather mention than explain in the exordium - Form of preseantion?

Final presentation: 7 min Exordium

End

Visual

Body language

Voice

From Gry:


/!\ Edit conflict - your version:



/!\ End of edit conflict


Week 41

Creative Design

Kasper Arentoft, Learning Zone KP


/!\ Edit conflict - other version:


Creative Design – the IDEO way By Kasper Arentoft

Model 1 Idea phase – observation and brainstorming. Generating ideas (no such thing as a bad idea, show no fear, don’t let realism stop you) Sorting and selection Concept development Concept test Visualization Project phase

Design of leverance Test Implementation Introduction

Model 2 – the innovative process

Model 3 – the creative process

(All models is attached to this document)

How to promote the innovative and creative process

Interdisciplinary team • Interaction design • Industrial design • Human factors • Environment design • Mechanical design • Electrical engineering • Manufacturing • Prototyping

Create Hot teams • Forgiveness, not permission • Different points of view • Virtual teams • Project management

Promote Passion • Love what you do • Display your darlings • Blend positivity and healthy scepticism

Be inspired by real customers • Really get out of the office • Focus on empathy and inspiration • Research is a creative task

Encourage experimentation • Behaviour • Insight • Experience • Form

Make the ideas freely and structured • Create an abundant idea economy • Declare ideas to be free • Facilitate the right brainstorming behaviors

Build on the ideas of others Focus on the topic One conversation at the time Encourage wild ideas Quantity over quality

Risk a little, gain a lot – and tolerate failure • Prototype often and early – repeat, repeat, repeat • Fail early to succeed sooner • Reward experimentation and failure • Chunk the risk with prototypes

Share the knowledge • Make the invisible visible • IDEO’s Techbox crosses the virtual/physical • Situate knowledge in work-a-day scenarios • Celebrate and promote knowledge gatherers

Enabling projects • Dedicated project village • Allows focus/immersion in the project • Makes invisible progress visible • Invites collaboration and critique • Protect and bond teams

SPACE IS THE FINAL FRONTIER

The right conditions

Be interdisciplinary Be passionate Create Hot teams Focus chaos Share knowledge Make ideas abundant and free Fail early and often Be grounded with real customers Build a creative Workspace environment

The Case We want to establish a new fast food chain in Denmark - with the focus on healthy food, good service, a nice experience and compatible prices.

But to create this we need to be innovative and to create an alternative to what we see today!

We want to radically improve the retail experience and consumption of food-on-the go - through e.g. new packaging, better service and a cool environment!.

How to observe Observe the real people. Connect and emphatize. Record and share the

• Interesting contradictions • Work arounds – see they own inventions. Do they use the products as they

• Surprising behaviour. – use the products differently than they were meant to be used.

• Body language – easy, difficult, frustrating.

• Pauses in action – steps of action when using the product.

Observation synthesis

Identify different individuals in different contexts Think about the quality of the experience Look carefully Notice all the details Be curious about what you see - talk to people Make notes about problems, opportunities, ideas and insights Take pictures and sketch to remind and share Collect items, cool stuff and inspiration to take with you Remember to get lunch yourself - and a receipt

• What kind of interactions is taking place? • What is missing? • Who are the people involved • How are people dressed? • What are people doing? • Collect stories

• Share your observations • Tell stories • Tell teammates • Post it Organize them into opportunity areas

Problems: things people have difficulties with Ideas: solutions we can develop Insights: we discovered these new perspectives Themes: Common issues

Brainstorming - A semi-structured team-based of rapid idea generation

Benefits: • Gets you unstuck • Generate ideas quickly • Expands alternatives • Creates teams • Renews enthusiasm

Method: • Set up in advance • Prepare the team • Use a facilitator – keep on time, keep to subject, follow the rules • Follow the rules • Evaluate the ideas – afterwards

Set-up: • A space where people can focus • Well-articulated need or specific topic • Paper, pens post-its • Warm-up • Brain food • 45-90 min

Facilitator • Introduces concisely & clearly • Reviews the rules • Leads warm-up exercises •Records every idea, without judging (no reformulations, use post-its) Enforces the rules tactfully, but firmly Leads the group

Why rules: • Promote free flow of ideas • Prevent decent into chaos

The Rules • Defer judgement (no is the forbidden word, no negative language) • Build on the ideas of others • Stay focused on the topic • One conversation at the time • Encourage wild ideas • Be visual • Go for quantity over quality • Evaluate afterwards

Talk • Use post-its • Save the ideas

DAY 2

Catch up from yesterday • What are your discoveries from yesterday? • What did work and what didn’t work? • Did you follow the phases – or did you do as you always have done? • Do you have any questions or insights you want to share?

Alterative brainstorming methods • Negative brainstorming Instead of the best product, imagine the worst product Take these negative ideas and change them into positive ideas • Association technique Facilitator put a word up. Association of 20 words • Circle technique Sitting in a circle, write down your idea. Send the note further and let other continue on what you started. • Picture shop Cut out pictures that inspire you. Sit down and tell the others how the picture inspires you relating to the topic. • Your creative idol Step into character of your creative idol and tell us what this character would like.

Sorting and grouping • Start by sorting your ideas

• Then group your ideas

• Create concepts - Select 3 concepts you want to test further

PROTOTYPING

Prototyping as a way of life • Learning by doing • Communicating by doing • Failing is ok

Get solid quickly • User feedback is easier • Communicates the concept • “Never go to a meeting without one”

Start simple • Quick • Dirty • Careless

Ways of prototyping • Enacted scenario – type pf theatre • Bodystorming – test out some of our assumptions about our product • Building the prototype • Appearance model (on computer) • Interactive hardware (interface checks)

Benefits • Very fast – allows explanation of lots of alternative solutions • Low costs – and a great opportunity to find obstacles when moving from idea to product • It is really easy – anyone can do it • Useful in presenting the final concept – benefits and WOW experience • Fun and teambuilding

Actual doing • Test your three concepts with rapid prototyping. Don’t make them it nice and pretty, but focus on testing the idea so that you can make the crucial decision later. • Make more than 1 prototype for each concept (maybe in smaller groups) • Present the prototypes to each other – discuss strengths, weaknesses and improvements • Use the material you can find, and save the prototypes

Lars Worning

Anxiety in Creative Processes By Lars Worning

Introduction • Creativity as the core pf the Kaospilot education • Navigate in chaos – find our own way, rely on our own creations/solutions

Def. Creativity (Lars Worning mixing French philosophers)

The highest reach of humanity is creativity, a sharing in the power of God, the Creator. Creativity is the mystery of freedom; that in man which is distinctively human. The ancient taboos surround man on every side, cramp his moral life. And to liberate himself from their power man must feel himself inwardly free and only then can he struggle externally for freedom, And the goal of that struggle is the creativity that is truly human. Man’s liberation is not only from somethingm but for something – this for is man’s creativity.

You meet anxiety in chaos. Chaos is a threat if you are not able to solve the situation. Practice to control your reactions in critical situations

Free will and Anxiety Fear – a fear of something concrete, clear. Anxiety – a fear of something abstract, blurred. But both feelings create similar emotions in man – except that when you have anxiety there is nothing to attack or nothing to flee from. But man usually attack or flee anyway. The fear is directed at the person/environment in our surroundings.

Søren Kierkegaard – Begrepet Angst Jean Paul Satre – Being and Nothingness (Væren og Intet)

Free will - knowledge about our possibilities Every choice we make is determining the rest of our life. We have the responsibility to do or not do. This freedom and responsibility of your own life creates anxiety.

When anxiety is in play, reason is not able to hold the toils. We use compulsive actions to avoid dealing with the actual problem – either because we are not able or that we are not willing.

Anxiety is necessary for your existential being to survive, in the same way as fear is necessary for the physical body to survive.

Terror – a picture of anxiety Use fear (physical threats) and anxiety (hidden/unnamed threats) to bend the will of the people. You don’t know when it comes, when it hits. Terror is described in the same way as anxiety.

Creativity Creativity is not an analytic process. Thinking does not create ideas. Focus your mind and then empty your mind. Out of the emptiness Creativity is impossible without meeting anxiety.

Søren Kierkegaard: You have to lose yourself to win yourself. Let go of your habits, cultural norms & the imagined ego. His suggestion arrives from the notion of Christianity that you are something to begin with.

Exercise: • Clean the room.

Meaning You can do anything if you know why. Meaning and a feeling of usefulness is important to confront anxiety. We will wait for instructions if not given any reason for why you should do something.

Staying in nothingness is creating anxiety. Examples: A too long hug

We can’t stand being in these situations and try to escape them.

Anxiety and Change Be aware of the fact that change can initiate anxiety. People act annoyed, critical and start isolated groups, but they are in fact anxious. You are placing them in chaos.

Body Self Development System • Manu Vision

Personal leadership (taking responsibility of your own life) Fears about personal leadership and good things about the fears. - To be confronted with who you are when seeing yourself from the outside. Good: Find out who you are - To be alone – in the physical world, the world of opinions Good: Learn to love yourself, before you hope for people to love you - That it will lead you to be a person you dislike. Good: That you find out now, instead of too later, when it can be too late to change.

- You can’t blame anyone/anything else Good: Responsibility for you r own actions. Good and bad. - To be someone no one will listen/to have nothing to give – self respect Accept yourself as you are. - That people will follow you without reflection Good: When you are a leader you sometimes make the decisions. - That life is running you, that you are not running life. Good: - That you don’t make the right choices Be aware that your choices affect your life and that by changing (making other choices) behaviour, you can alter your life.

The fears are not necessarily bad, they are just our anxiety. Many of our fears are also the good things about personal leadership. That you are independent, that you take responsibility of your own life and accept yourself as you are.

Email: larsworning@hotmail.com

Karoline Kjeldtoft, Designer

Creative processes – personal experience By Karoline Kjeldtoft

Education and experience from fashion design and the fashion industry. Also theatre and costume design, graphic design The lecture will focus on her dream project come true, named 86/77/96 Old women measurements for breast, waist and hips

86/77/96

Fashion The main condition is that things that should refer/relate to the body. Why only the focus on the clothes to fit 20 year old, slim women body? Why don’t we focus more on the object we are relating to – namely the body?

Beauty ideal Now the ideal is the slim, skinny, tall and young body. But the ideal has also change a lot during the decades.

Focus of project • Age • Clothes as a comment, as a way to say something about the world

She uses 80 year old women as model body. (She had difficulties finding pictures/measurements of old women. She ended up looking for models to photograph the models herself.)

We have a cultural reservation for old age and old bodies. And we have a picture of old people as nice, wise & non-sexual and we measure our own youth towards them. And what is the beauty ideal for the old body.

When making the clothes

• Tone down function • Tone down trend: Wanted it to more common. Time shouldn’t be the first thing you think of.

• Working with the body as a sculpture. • Use the skin as part of the fabric of the clothes, as an integrated part of the clothes. • Make a contrast to the beauty ideal that is built in to our minds. • Make the clothes so delicate and elegant that people have to look at them. • Classic and well-known dresses as the starting point (Coco Chanel – the little black dress)

Tools for idea development

• Be real to the process – take all the questions and challenges serious. No compromises. • If you work with amateurs, take care of them or find someone to do so. They all reach outside their comfort zone, their own limits.

Exercise: Big paper, draw 30 squares on it Draw as many representations of an apple you can think of. Hopefully all 30 squares. They must all be different ideas.

Idea development tool Vision Imagine if…then what? Idea/problem Main idea/problem/theme Validity Why does the World need this? Relevance Why does the World need this now? Professional validity Why does your profession need this? Target group Who is the product made for? Inspiration What made me start (from outside) Motivation What made me start (from inside) Personal validity Why do I need to make this project? Method How will the work be done?

Target What is the main target? A concrete version of the idea. Scope What will exactly be finished and done at the end?

Product What characteristic has the result?

Project managing Schedule Priority of time during the project

Budget Under which economical circumstances is the project taking place? Collaborators Who will be involved in the project? Enclosure What will be enclosed in this description?

Tools • 15 min where you write non-stop on a precise question, or brain storm. • Apple exercise • 10 min sparring with a friend on a precise question, or brain storm. • 15 min of listing or putting chaos into diagrams – to get hold of many threads and thoughts • 15 min to end up with 3 solutions on your questions, pick one of them next day • 15 min mind map – on a precise question or brain storm • 15 min on your back in an undisturbed place with one precise question in your mind.

Email: karoline@talent.dk


/!\ Edit conflict - your version:


Creative Design – the IDEO way By Kasper Arentoft

Model 1 Idea phase – observation and brainstorming. Generating ideas (no such thing as a bad idea, show no fear, don’t let realism stop you) Sorting and selection Concept development Concept test Visualization Project phase

Design of leverance Test Implementation Introduction

Model 2 – the innovative process

Model 3 – the creative process

(All models is attached to this document)

How to promote the innovative and creative process

Interdisciplinary team • Interaction design • Industrial design • Human factors • Environment design • Mechanical design • Electrical engineering • Manufacturing • Prototyping

Create Hot teams • Forgiveness, not permission • Different points of view • Virtual teams • Project management

Promote Passion • Love what you do • Display your darlings • Blend positivity and healthy scepticism

Be inspired by real customers • Really get out of the office • Focus on empathy and inspiration • Research is a creative task

Encourage experimentation • Behaviour • Insight • Experience • Form

Make the ideas freely and structured • Create an abundant idea economy • Declare ideas to be free • Facilitate the right brainstorming behaviors

Build on the ideas of others Focus on the topic One conversation at the time Encourage wild ideas Quantity over quality

Risk a little, gain a lot – and tolerate failure • Prototype often and early – repeat, repeat, repeat • Fail early to succeed sooner • Reward experimentation and failure • Chunk the risk with prototypes

Share the knowledge • Make the invisible visible • IDEO’s Techbox crosses the virtual/physical • Situate knowledge in work-a-day scenarios • Celebrate and promote knowledge gatherers

Enabling projects • Dedicated project village • Allows focus/immersion in the project • Makes invisible progress visible • Invites collaboration and critique • Protect and bond teams

SPACE IS THE FINAL FRONTIER

The right conditions

Be interdisciplinary Be passionate Create Hot teams Focus chaos Share knowledge Make ideas abundant and free Fail early and often Be grounded with real customers Build a creative Workspace environment

The Case We want to establish a new fast food chain in Denmark - with the focus on healthy food, good service, a nice experience and compatible prices.

But to create this we need to be innovative and to create an alternative to what we see today!

We want to radically improve the retail experience and consumption of food-on-the go - through e.g. new packaging, better service and a cool environment!.

How to observe Observe the real people. Connect and emphatize. Record and share the

• Interesting contradictions • Work arounds – see they own inventions. Do they use the products as they

• Surprising behaviour. – use the products differently than they were meant to be used.

• Body language – easy, difficult, frustrating.

• Pauses in action – steps of action when using the product.

Observation synthesis

Identify different individuals in different contexts Think about the quality of the experience Look carefully Notice all the details Be curious about what you see - talk to people Make notes about problems, opportunities, ideas and insights Take pictures and sketch to remind and share Collect items, cool stuff and inspiration to take with you Remember to get lunch yourself - and a receipt

• What kind of interactions is taking place? • What is missing? • Who are the people involved • How are people dressed? • What are people doing? • Collect stories

• Share your observations • Tell stories • Tell teammates • Post it Organize them into opportunity areas

Problems: things people have difficulties with Ideas: solutions we can develop Insights: we discovered these new perspectives Themes: Common issues

Brainstorming - A semi-structured team-based of rapid idea generation

Benefits: • Gets you unstuck • Generate ideas quickly • Expands alternatives • Creates teams • Renews enthusiasm

Method: • Set up in advance • Prepare the team • Use a facilitator – keep on time, keep to subject, follow the rules • Follow the rules • Evaluate the ideas – afterwards

Set-up: • A space where people can focus • Well-articulated need or specific topic • Paper, pens post-its • Warm-up • Brain food • 45-90 min

Facilitator • Introduces concisely & clearly • Reviews the rules • Leads warm-up exercises •Records every idea, without judging (no reformulations, use post-its) Enforces the rules tactfully, but firmly Leads the group

Why rules: • Promote free flow of ideas • Prevent decent into chaos

The Rules • Defer judgement (no is the forbidden word, no negative language) • Build on the ideas of others • Stay focused on the topic • One conversation at the time • Encourage wild ideas • Be visual • Go for quantity over quality • Evaluate afterwards

Talk • Use post-its • Save the ideas

DAY 2

Catch up from yesterday • What are your discoveries from yesterday? • What did work and what didn’t work? • Did you follow the phases – or did you do as you always have done? • Do you have any questions or insights you want to share?

Alterative brainstorming methods • Negative brainstorming Instead of the best product, imagine the worst product Take these negative ideas and change them into positive ideas • Association technique Facilitator put a word up. Association of 20 words • Circle technique Sitting in a circle, write down your idea. Send the note further and let other continue on what you started. • Picture shop Cut out pictures that inspire you. Sit down and tell the others how the picture inspires you relating to the topic. • Your creative idol Step into character of your creative idol and tell us what this character would like.

Sorting and grouping • Start by sorting your ideas

• Then group your ideas

• Create concepts - Select 3 concepts you want to test further

PROTOTYPING

Prototyping as a way of life • Learning by doing • Communicating by doing • Failing is ok

Get solid quickly • User feedback is easier • Communicates the concept • “Never go to a meeting without one”

Start simple • Quick • Dirty • Careless

Ways of prototyping • Enacted scenario – type pf theatre • Bodystorming – test out some of our assumptions about our product • Building the prototype • Appearance model (on computer) • Interactive hardware (interface checks)

Benefits • Very fast – allows explanation of lots of alternative solutions • Low costs – and a great opportunity to find obstacles when moving from idea to product • It is really easy – anyone can do it • Useful in presenting the final concept – benefits and WOW experience • Fun and teambuilding

Actual doing • Test your three concepts with rapid prototyping. Don’t make them it nice and pretty, but focus on testing the idea so that you can make the crucial decision later. • Make more than 1 prototype for each concept (maybe in smaller groups) • Present the prototypes to each other – discuss strengths, weaknesses and improvements • Use the material you can find, and save the prototypes

Lars Worning

Anxiety in Creative Processes By Lars Worning

Introduction • Creativity as the core pf the Kaospilot education • Navigate in chaos – find our own way, rely on our own creations/solutions

Def. Creativity (Lars Worning mixing French philosophers)

The highest reach of humanity is creativity, a sharing in the power of God, the Creator. Creativity is the mystery of freedom; that in man which is distinctively human. The ancient taboos surround man on every side, cramp his moral life. And to liberate himself from their power man must feel himself inwardly free and only then can he struggle externally for freedom, And the goal of that struggle is the creativity that is truly human. Man’s liberation is not only from somethingm but for something – this for is man’s creativity.

You meet anxiety in chaos. Chaos is a threat if you are not able to solve the situation. Practice to control your reactions in critical situations

Free will and Anxiety Fear – a fear of something concrete, clear. Anxiety – a fear of something abstract, blurred. But both feelings create similar emotions in man – except that when you have anxiety there is nothing to attack or nothing to flee from. But man usually attack or flee anyway. The fear is directed at the person/environment in our surroundings.

Søren Kierkegaard – Begrepet Angst Jean Paul Satre – Being and Nothingness (Væren og Intet)

Free will - knowledge about our possibilities Every choice we make is determining the rest of our life. We have the responsibility to do or not do. This freedom and responsibility of your own life creates anxiety.

When anxiety is in play, reason is not able to hold the toils. We use compulsive actions to avoid dealing with the actual problem – either because we are not able or that we are not willing.

Anxiety is necessary for your existential being to survive, in the same way as fear is necessary for the physical body to survive.

Terror – a picture of anxiety Use fear (physical threats) and anxiety (hidden/unnamed threats) to bend the will of the people. You don’t know when it comes, when it hits. Terror is described in the same way as anxiety.

Creativity Creativity is not an analytic process. Thinking does not create ideas. Focus your mind and then empty your mind. Out of the emptiness Creativity is impossible without meeting anxiety.

Søren Kierkegaard: You have to lose yourself to win yourself. Let go of your habits, cultural norms & the imagined ego. His suggestion arrives from the notion of Christianity that you are something to begin with.

Exercise: • Clean the room.

Meaning You can do anything if you know why. Meaning and a feeling of usefulness is important to confront anxiety. We will wait for instructions if not given any reason for why you should do something.

Staying in nothingness is creating anxiety. Examples: A too long hug

We can’t stand being in these situations and try to escape them.

Anxiety and Change Be aware of the fact that change can initiate anxiety. People act annoyed, critical and start isolated groups, but they are in fact anxious. You are placing them in chaos.

Body Self Development System • Manu Vision

Personal leadership (taking responsibility of your own life) Fears about personal leadership and good things about the fears. - To be confronted with who you are when seeing yourself from the outside. Good: Find out who you are - To be alone – in the physical world, the world of opinions Good: Learn to love yourself, before you hope for people to love you - That it will lead you to be a person you dislike. Good: That you find out now, instead of too later, when it can be too late to change.

- You can’t blame anyone/anything else Good: Responsibility for you r own actions. Good and bad. - To be someone no one will listen/to have nothing to give – self respect Accept yourself as you are. - That people will follow you without reflection Good: When you are a leader you sometimes make the decisions. - That life is running you, that you are not running life. Good: - That you don’t make the right choices Be aware that your choices affect your life and that by changing (making other choices) behaviour, you can alter your life.

The fears are not necessarily bad, they are just our anxiety. Many of our fears are also the good things about personal leadership. That you are independent, that you take responsibility of your own life and accept yourself as you are.

Email: larsworning@hotmail.com

Karoline Kjeldtoft, Designer

Creative processes – personal experience By Karoline Kjeldtoft

Education and experience from fashion design and the fashion industry. Also theatre and costume design, graphic design The lecture will focus on her dream project come true, named 86/77/96 Old women measurements for breast, waist and hips

86/77/96

Fashion The main condition is that things that should refer/relate to the body. Why only the focus on the clothes to fit 20 year old, slim women body? Why don’t we focus more on the object we are relating to – namely the body?

Beauty ideal Now the ideal is the slim, skinny, tall and young body. But the ideal has also change a lot during the decades.

Focus of project • Age • Clothes as a comment, as a way to say something about the world

She uses 80 year old women as model body. (She had difficulties finding pictures/measurements of old women. She ended up looking for models to photograph the models herself.)

We have a cultural reservation for old age and old bodies. And we have a picture of old people as nice, wise & non-sexual and we measure our own youth towards them. And what is the beauty ideal for the old body.

When making the clothes

• Tone down function • Tone down trend: Wanted it to more common. Time shouldn’t be the first thing you think of.

• Working with the body as a sculpture. • Use the skin as part of the fabric of the clothes, as an integrated part of the clothes. • Make a contrast to the beauty ideal that is built in to our minds. • Make the clothes so delicate and elegant that people have to look at them. • Classic and well-known dresses as the starting point (Coco Chanel – the little black dress)

Tools for idea development

• Be real to the process – take all the questions and challenges serious. No compromises. • If you work with amateurs, take care of them or find someone to do so. They all reach outside their comfort zone, their own limits.

Exercise: Big paper, draw 30 squares on it Draw as many representations of an apple you can think of. Hopefully all 30 squares. They must all be different ideas.

Idea development tool Vision Imagine if…then what? Idea/problem Main idea/problem/theme Validity Why does the World need this? Relevance Why does the World need this now? Professional validity Why does your profession need this? Target group Who is the product made for? Inspiration What made me start (from outside) Motivation What made me start (from inside) Personal validity Why do I need to make this project? Method How will the work be done?

Target What is the main target? A concrete version of the idea. Scope What will exactly be finished and done at the end?

Product What characteristic has the result?

Project managing Schedule Priority of time during the project

Budget Under which economical circumstances is the project taking place? Collaborators Who will be involved in the project? Enclosure What will be enclosed in this description?

Tools • 15 min where you write non-stop on a precise question, or brain storm. • Apple exercise • 10 min sparring with a friend on a precise question, or brain storm. • 15 min of listing or putting chaos into diagrams – to get hold of many threads and thoughts • 15 min to end up with 3 solutions on your questions, pick one of them next day • 15 min mind map – on a precise question or brain storm • 15 min on your back in an undisturbed place with one precise question in your mind.

Email: karoline@talent.dk


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Nikki Bonne, Photografer

Week 42

Fall Vacation

Week 43

Creative Design

Kasper Arentoft, Learning Zone KP

Nikki Bonne, Photografer

Week 44

Organisation, Systemic Thinking and Leadership

Ouafa Rian


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Systemic Thinking By Ouafa Rian www.rian.dk

Draft from PART I: Heading towards something we don’t control We make up our own mind about what is happening around us. Every action has a reaction – both on a individual level, as well as collective level.

PART II (13.00-15.45) Natural laws Is religion a natural law? If yes, how does that affect our Western society?

Linear versus circular

Spirituality in an intellectual frame Does the abstract need to become concrete to be real?

Many underlying laws – when does an assumed rule become truth?

Delete all absolutes (movement from 1960-70’s) – Jungian archetypes Faith, truth, belief Choice – making a choice is a hunt for the truth

Is truth an absolute? Negotiate for truth, or at least a shared truth, an experience of the world

Living systems (F. Capra) Conditions to determine whether a system is a living system

• Network A pattern of organization that is a self creating, self maintaining and self renewing network of relation in which each of the parts in ht system is there to take part in creation, maintenance and renewing of other parts in the system.

• Dissipative structure (flow) The network of relation is embodied in a physical structure that upholds its form by a constant flow of energy and matter through and in the physical structure.

• Life process (bringing forth the world) The ongoing embodiment into physical structure happen by a life process which the living system interacts with its environment. In that process the living system creates its interior world view.

Understand the self organization of a living system by: The Core of self/identity around which the system organize itself. What gives a human identity can be translated into identity-material for an organization.

The Network of relations that builds up: Unpredictable possibilities of correlation is “good”

The Flow of Information that happens. To give and take information is a question of attitude.

• Need to know versus Nice to know - also a question of attitude. • Unpredictability and differences is good.

Levers for supporting self organization in a living system The possibility to self-organize in complex and dynamic systems is there, you can either impede it or support it. Make the network of relations rich and diverse Enable: Flow of information

Create or sustain the core identity

Non-linearity Networks, projects, humans, learning, knowledge, multi-culturality, processes, relations, economy, markets etc. These are all emergence of things not predictable. As chaos, these events don’t happen randomly, but they are impossible to predict.

The language of living systems • Complexity: Many-folded, compound. • Dynamic: Changeable, moveable. • Chaos: Unpredictable, yet not random, yet not coincidental states occurring in the system. • Self organization: The system displays the ability to do/create those circumstances by itself. • Network: A structure for organizing, from where you can get at any other point to another at any time. • Dissipative structure: Flow. • Non-linearity: No a one-to-one relation. • Emergence: When parts get complex enough, conditions occur that were unpredictable when focusing on the parts. • A system: Wholeness of parts constituting the system and thereby bring forth a united functionality. Remember: If we change the language, we change the world

Ebbe Lundgård, COOP Norden and former Miniter of Culture

Leadership from a personal persepctive By Ebbe Lundgård

Agenda: • Intro • Experience • Structures • Change as a leader • Leadership background • Basic preconditions • Informal

Introduction • Leadership is a about excerting power. • “There is no gathering word for power” – århusian philosopher

• Power is dependend on a audience - it has to be excerted

• Democracy is by now the best solution to excert power

• You should be proud to be leader.

Experience Has been a leader in some situation or other since highschool • Earned lieutenant status in the military, then worked in the royal guard. Wanted to be the one to give orders, not taken them • University in Copenhagen – chairman of the committee for the youth rebellion. • Folkhigh teacher, while teaching at the university • Principle at a folkhigh school • Director of assosiation of folkhigh schools • Chairman of the association of cosumer products in Copenhagen (FDB) • Political career – former Danish minister of Culture

Structures of leadership

Pyramid structure/top down leadership Eg. In the military Take orders from the layer above you, give orders to the ones under you.

The circle structure E.g. in a folkhigh school Discuss, discuss until you reach a solution Involve everybody Somebody that has the responsibility – but still having to share all decisions Majority rule/or strongest voice rule.

The square structure E.g. in politics Convince, negotiation & involving others to make others see what your agenda is. Then you take a decision By counting up the different votes, you see whether your decision is accepted or not.

Change Leadership is about change. You have to adapt to change or trigger the change Change it itself is of no vlaue. It has to happen for a reason and that reason you have to share with the ones you are a leader for.

8 pre-conditions for change • Necessity The change has to necessary and you have to communicate the necessity to the people you lead

• Coalition – you have to form a coalition, you have to know that people with you, an open coalition. But you also need to be aware that somebody won’t be part of it, some people you need to say goodbye to.

• Vision – Strategy (development) The vision is to underline where you want to be in the future, where will want to go. The strategy is the way to reach that goal, a road to the vision made true.

• Storytelling Tell the story to everybody in the organization/company of the change. Meet the people, tell them why it is necessary, and make understand. And improve the story every time you tell it.

• Action When the story has been told, you need to take action. And do something very concrete.

• Low hanging fruits Pick the immediate results from the change. The immediate improvements. Show the a small, concrete advantage to the organization/company.

• Consolidate results (change) This is now how we work, this is how we generate results. And you have legitimate a certain way acting.

• Nailing/anchering This action/this change is now a part of how the organization act, solve and change.

Questions: • Where in this model do we meet the most resistance and change? Inviting people to come with ideas for a vision and strategy – often the leaders end up formulating both because the people of the organization are afraid to contribute, that they have to simple or stupid ideas. But when you get to the storytelling, the people get involved.

• What are the success criterias for creating a vision for a company? It is to get as many people as possible to form/formulate the vision and strategy.

• How do we deal with passive restistance? What will passive resistance lead to? Insome companies it will end with people being sacked if they are not engaged. But one important questions is: Why are the people passive? Why are they not engaged? Have workshop that “force” the employers to express their feelings. So that you can find out some of they why.

Leadership background Eight kinds of intelligence/abilities • Vision What do you want with your leadership? Is the job just interesting or do you want to move something?

• Communication Communication is key word. You have to be able tell stories to people, inform them. Communicate your thoughts.

• Heart/Passion You need to feel engaged in the job, have a passion and a feel for the job. Or else you become a techincal leader. Not necessarily fruitful in the long run.

• Team building How to build a team? How to create an atmosphere of mutual understanding and trust, a room where people dare to express themselves? But were you still act as the head/captain of the team?

• Preserveance Stayer ability. Do you have the stamina and the will to do what it takes to make something happen?

• Will to listen Do you read the signals, understand and listen to what is said to you? Are you perceptive?

• Social intelligence To be a social person. Understand the way people are together, the social mechanisms underlying our interaction. Be aware of and at least try to understand the cultural differences.

• Diversity Ability and courage to divcersity the group or people you are leading. Don’t make clones, dare to have diversity (background, skills and competences as well as ethnicity and sex)

Basic preconditions 4 basic traits • Knowledge Knowledge about cultural background and general knowledge about life

• Empathy The ability to understand how people react, take their feelings into consideration when making decisions

• Tolerance Open mind/. Open to other peoples opinions and interested in those opinions, not only tolerating other peoples opinions

• Ambition You have to have some wants, ambitions.

Informal qualifications • Know your weaknesses –be aware of how you react in different situations • Control of feelings, have a poker face. Don’t show your immediate dislikes. • Small talk (tend receptions. Hehehe) If the conversation is boring, put on the poker phase

Uffe Elbæk, KP

Leadership from a KaosPilot point of view By Uffe Elbæk

Agenda • Share 6 personal stories from my professional career (1982-2005) • 3 different perspectives on leadership and organization • Introduce 1 to 2 actual projects

Stories and their underlying patterns Story 1 Jimmy Larsen (the star of the circus) – Århus 1982 • Forced to take action and create my own job, if I am to get what I want. • How to work with motivation? Identify strenghts and abilities.

• Meet the outsider – feel their ambition. • Turn weaknesses into strengths, how to go into problem and find the hidden solution.

Story 2 Next Stop Sovjet – 1989 • Frontrunner almost shut down, • Caravans from Danmark to Sovjet – final concert on the Red Square (university) • Do you see any change and power in Sovjet? Yes, but not before 20 years have passed.

• Do not underrestimate social change • Weak signals. How do we train ourself to listen for the weak signals?

Story 3 Project Kaospilots - Jan 1991 • Econmic crisis for the Frontrunners • What kind of education should we have that could enable us to handle the projects

• Who should be the head of the school?

• What motivates us to say yes?

Story 4 Outpost in San Fransisco – 1996 • Meeting with important CEO – meeting failing miserably Why should I listen to you, and your story? Are you aware of the culture in the context you are? Do you know what you ask for? • Tip from VISA founder, 4 simple steps for handling failure. 1. Identify your failure – what went wrong? 2. Take your part of the responsibility for the failure, and know what the 3. What can I learn from this? 4. Do it differently next time

Story 5 Outpost in Durban, South Africa – 2001 • Do we really know where the deep, big change-waves come from?

• Political history as a medium • It is very easy to think about/imagine you know a lot, but do you act in the world? • Know all the facts, but you need your heart - Galtung

• What competences are needed to create results? Story 6 Vigdis Finbonadottir in Reykjavik - 2005 • What kind of culture is created when men are afraid of men?

• The many voices in an organization

3 perspectives on leadership/organizational behaviour Reflection 1 – 4 kinds of leadership DRAW FIGURE • Below: Leaders have to be able to move people in a certain direction,

• Besides: Peer to peer leadership – partners/collegues • Above: Leadership towards people above you • Myself: Personal leadership

What kind leadership to perfom on people below, besides, above you and at last (not least) how am I leader for myself? The result? A structure were everyone is supporting everyone.

Reflection 2 – Organizational structure at KP You have a structure were everyone is supporting everyone. The Kaospilot is in between this system and the old hierarchical structure. Kaospilot move between the old hierarchical structure, the fishnet and the atomic structure. When are the school supporting itself on what?

Reflection 3 – My vision/our vision • The paradox – My vision/Our vision Uffe: Vision . Strategy . Action plan . Time -> Result Staff: All have their individiual visions and strategies. Understand what motivates me and what motivates members of the staff to work at the Kaospilot. How does this work together? To manage to put the person vision into the collective vision Respect that there is something that is bigger than you. How can you incooperate your vision into a collective vision.

3 important words when we talk about change leadership • Identity • Meaning • Self Control Good leadership in change situation, so that they don’t loose their self-control.

One giant Leap project Time, mask, money, confrontation, god, inspiratiomn, sex, death, happy

Ørjan Jensen

How to navigate in organisations By Ørjan Jensen

Litterature Frederick Winslow Taylor Henri Fayol Elton Mayo’s Hawthorne studies/experiments (1927-1932) (Western Electric Hawthorne Works, Chicago) Iben Tranholm - Himmelflugten

Introduction • Military background

• The dialectic relationship between theories and practises.

• Learning starting from trying to navigate in the confusion.

• Leadership versus management

Background • Military • Kaospilot team manager • NLP – Neuro Linguistic Programming – how by changing language, you can change behaviour • Hypno therapist

Elements of leadership Mastery • What kind of expectations do leaders have today?

• Leadership books are talking about self-mastery.

• People/organizations that master self-mastery are able to lead themselves.

Flexibility • There are questions of quality and demand from people or in organisation. When to be flexible

• Not about doing what other people tell you do and accept those missions.

• Manouver tactics – if that happens, we do this, but when another thing happens we do that.

• Fight the old belief that all challenges can be met with planning.

• Being able to understand other peoples way of thinking as well as your own • Leadership is not about having followers accepting the leaders orders blindly.

Command and Control Leadership (back in fashion) Command and control, telling people what to do and what not do, taking care of them, taking all the reposibility. Controlling if you do your work correctly and controlling/checking if you are feeling ok. Beloved leaders that makes people insecure and passive

Why is this structure unhealthy? People not able to organise, manage themselves.

What is the alternative difficult? The complexity The efficiancy All the employees need to be commited

The caring leader today Make sure that the people are commited and take care of them by isolating the people that disagree/sabotage.

Organisation as an organism

Surveys International companies in the Western countires (Europe and USA) What kind of people do we find in organisation. 10% Self managers, by nature.

60% Reactive Want to change, but have to be activated to change.

30% Blocked The more you try to involve them, change them, the more they block themselves out/in

The last 30% gets the most attention. 90% of the resources. And they will be the people that are fired in the future.

University students 3% of the students starting at the university have a goal with their education. A plan.

Navigate in organisations • No one is holding the truth, because there is no truth. • Map the territory (prejects; revealing the intentions and points of view)

• Flexibitlity is about accepting that the map is not the territtory.

Types of manouvering • Trip on a boat – looking through the back window.

• Look at future, what do I want, what to happen, where do I want to go. Find a strategy in for

Learning Classic definition of learning: Relatively lasting change of behaviour Modern definition of learning: Learning is a change of action and thinking

Wrap-up Exercise: Rub your hands together until they get warm. Fold your hands and see what thumb is on top. Rub your hands together again. This time let the other tumb be on top. (Ref. Ketan’s exercise on our resistance to change)

Navigate yourself through life in organisations towards a goal. Remember to not be afraid to change the goal.

New disease: Being burned out People with no goals, no ambition and either not knowing what they want or wanting nothing. Our way of thinking is affection our body to a large extent. Placebo affect – self-healing Self-fulfilling prophecies

Stability versus change 80% want more of the same, only 20% look for new things/welcome change.

Questions • What is my goal with being here? What is the motivation for my actions. • Is it good enough to be the person who feels how she resists change, but still does it?

Frank Aggerholm, Danish University of Education

An academic introduction systemic thinking and communication By Frank Agerholm

Def. Kaospilot Navigate in chaos Reduce complexity

Main focus 1. Overall introduction to Niklas Luhmann system theory 2. Different kinds of social systems – different kinds of communication 3. Organizations and a perspective on leadership 4. Questions, discussion and/or reflection

Complexity

Main points/presumptions in the system theory

• You cannot fight complexity E.g. the founding of a grass root organization with the proclaimed aim to fight complexity would itself just produce more complexity

• The surrounding world is always more complex than the system. vs. The system is always more complex than the surrounding world can grasp

• The more complex the system, the more complexity is able to reduce

• All the systems are in the world

• An observer (a specific system) can from his/her own point of observation observe:

• Whatever is observed, something else could be observed instead – thus observations are contingent.

• Whatever the point of observation, it would have been another point of observation – thus the point of observation is contingent.

• Since observations are contingent and the points of observations likewise are contingent, this relation between the point of observation and the observed is double-contingent. Very complex.

• Foreign complexity can only be reduced by its own complexity

• Foreign reference can only be constructed by self-reference

Main aphorism of system theory

What are systems?

Psychical systems think – thus operate on the basis of though/consciousness Social systems communicate – thus operate on the basis of comminication

General characteristics for systems Structual determination

Systems constitute and upload themselves through producingg and maintaining difference to the surrounding world. In other words, they set a boundary between system and the surrounding world.

How does a system create relatations to the surrounding world, when nothing from the surrounding world enters the system and v ice versa and the distinction between the system and the surrounding world is an autopoietic operation?

Opeative Closure and Structural Coupling

The answer to the question is that the realtion is deteminded by Operative Closure and Structural Coupling.

• Operative Closure

• Structural Coupling

• Interdenpendancy

• Interpenetration

Selection as reductionof complexity Different kinds of systems make selection on different basic

Psychical systems and reduction of complexity

Consciousness – psychical operation The psychical system is to be understood as the conscious mind Thoughts produce thoughts Brain and the conscious mind:

(Rest of slide must be added)

Social systems and reduction of complexity

Communication = social operation 3 Selections

Sometimes a fouth is mentioned (control of understanding)

The selections are produced by communication itself Luhmann aphorisms:

(How can the mind participate in communication? In Racsch, W – Theories of distinction, p. 169)

How can social systems commnicate?

When a system meet a disturbance, the system needs to make a selection (find a solution). By making that slection you volunteer to reduce the complexity in that communication.

Different social systems – communication

Communication and Medium

Psychical and social systems use mediums for their autopoietic

Different kinds of social systems:

All types of social systems work on the basic of communication, depend on the 3 selections:

Interactions • Constributions form two or more psychical systems • The participants are able to percieve eachother simuntaneoulsy Or rather, the participants are able to percieve each others contribution to communication simultaneously.

• An interaction system emerges. People meet and communicate • It just happens and when it no longer happens the interaction system dissolves (Lack one sentence)

Society systems Segmentary differentiated society systems

Stratified differentiated society system

Functionally differentiated societies

ALL THREE TYPES EXIST.

Functionally differentiated society systems - FDSS

• Increased complexity calls for more complex ways of reducing complexity • The need for more complex ways of handling complexity calls for different functions, thereof the name. • FDSSs uses different symbolic generalized mediums in the reduction of complexity • In regards to the medium they furthermore differentiate on the basis of binary codes • In order to reflect this, the complexity is furthermore reduced by different reflection programs:

CODE AND REFLECTION PROGRAMS (GET FROM SLIDE)

Social system Medium Code Relection Program Religion Truth/faith Immanence/Transcendence Theology Economy Money Payment/Profit Prices/Costs/Accounting

Function, contribution and institutionalization • FDSSs have different functions • They make contribtion to society in different ways • They institutionalize in different ways (GET OVERVIEW FORM SLIDE)

Social system Function Contribution Institutionalisation Economy Shortage reduction Satisfaction of needs Companies Religion Handling of contingency Deacony Chuches, mosque etc

Organizations and leadership

Organizations

Makes the distinction to the surrounding world in a different way than interaction system and FDSS A spesific social system Replaces the external dependencies on internal dependencies which the organization produces itself. It makes its own conditions for

This provides particular structures of expectation, which helps reducing complexity, iternally and externally.

The organization is nor entirely insensitive to foreign disturbance (pertubation)

The identity of the organization is challenged by internal and external disturbance. And it takes ongoing decisions and negotiations to keep up the identity – a complexity which again shapes identity. (Negotiate forth your reality in communication with others – Ouafa Rian)

Leadership (Frank Agerholm thoughs) Segemtary

Stratified

Functionally differentiated

ALL THREE EXIST TODAY – WHICH ONE DESCRIBES YOU?


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Systemic Thinking By Ouafa Rian www.rian.dk

Draft from PART I: Heading towards something we don’t control We make up our own mind about what is happening around us. Every action has a reaction – both on a individual level, as well as collective level.

PART II (13.00-15.45) Natural laws Is religion a natural law? If yes, how does that affect our Western society?

Linear versus circular

Spirituality in an intellectual frame Does the abstract need to become concrete to be real?

Many underlying laws – when does an assumed rule become truth?

Delete all absolutes (movement from 1960-70’s) – Jungian archetypes Faith, truth, belief Choice – making a choice is a hunt for the truth

Is truth an absolute? Negotiate for truth, or at least a shared truth, an experience of the world

Living systems (F. Capra) Conditions to determine whether a system is a living system

• Network A pattern of organization that is a self creating, self maintaining and self renewing network of relation in which each of the parts in ht system is there to take part in creation, maintenance and renewing of other parts in the system.

• Dissipative structure (flow) The network of relation is embodied in a physical structure that upholds its form by a constant flow of energy and matter through and in the physical structure.

• Life process (bringing forth the world) The ongoing embodiment into physical structure happen by a life process which the living system interacts with its environment. In that process the living system creates its interior world view.

Understand the self organization of a living system by: The Core of self/identity around which the system organize itself. What gives a human identity can be translated into identity-material for an organization.

The Network of relations that builds up: Unpredictable possibilities of correlation is “good”

The Flow of Information that happens. To give and take information is a question of attitude.

• Need to know versus Nice to know - also a question of attitude. • Unpredictability and differences is good.

Levers for supporting self organization in a living system The possibility to self-organize in complex and dynamic systems is there, you can either impede it or support it. Make the network of relations rich and diverse Enable: Flow of information

Create or sustain the core identity

Non-linearity Networks, projects, humans, learning, knowledge, multi-culturality, processes, relations, economy, markets etc. These are all emergence of things not predictable. As chaos, these events don’t happen randomly, but they are impossible to predict.

The language of living systems • Complexity: Many-folded, compound. • Dynamic: Changeable, moveable. • Chaos: Unpredictable, yet not random, yet not coincidental states occurring in the system. • Self organization: The system displays the ability to do/create those circumstances by itself. • Network: A structure for organizing, from where you can get at any other point to another at any time. • Dissipative structure: Flow. • Non-linearity: No a one-to-one relation. • Emergence: When parts get complex enough, conditions occur that were unpredictable when focusing on the parts. • A system: Wholeness of parts constituting the system and thereby bring forth a united functionality. Remember: If we change the language, we change the world

Ebbe Lundgård, COOP Norden and former Miniter of Culture

Leadership from a personal persepctive By Ebbe Lundgård

Agenda: • Intro • Experience • Structures • Change as a leader • Leadership background • Basic preconditions • Informal

Introduction • Leadership is a about excerting power. • “There is no gathering word for power” – århusian philosopher

• Power is dependend on a audience - it has to be excerted

• Democracy is by now the best solution to excert power

• You should be proud to be leader.

Experience Has been a leader in some situation or other since highschool • Earned lieutenant status in the military, then worked in the royal guard. Wanted to be the one to give orders, not taken them • University in Copenhagen – chairman of the committee for the youth rebellion. • Folkhigh teacher, while teaching at the university • Principle at a folkhigh school • Director of assosiation of folkhigh schools • Chairman of the association of cosumer products in Copenhagen (FDB) • Political career – former Danish minister of Culture

Structures of leadership

Pyramid structure/top down leadership Eg. In the military Take orders from the layer above you, give orders to the ones under you.

The circle structure E.g. in a folkhigh school Discuss, discuss until you reach a solution Involve everybody Somebody that has the responsibility – but still having to share all decisions Majority rule/or strongest voice rule.

The square structure E.g. in politics Convince, negotiation & involving others to make others see what your agenda is. Then you take a decision By counting up the different votes, you see whether your decision is accepted or not.

Change Leadership is about change. You have to adapt to change or trigger the change Change it itself is of no vlaue. It has to happen for a reason and that reason you have to share with the ones you are a leader for.

8 pre-conditions for change • Necessity The change has to necessary and you have to communicate the necessity to the people you lead

• Coalition – you have to form a coalition, you have to know that people with you, an open coalition. But you also need to be aware that somebody won’t be part of it, some people you need to say goodbye to.

• Vision – Strategy (development) The vision is to underline where you want to be in the future, where will want to go. The strategy is the way to reach that goal, a road to the vision made true.

• Storytelling Tell the story to everybody in the organization/company of the change. Meet the people, tell them why it is necessary, and make understand. And improve the story every time you tell it.

• Action When the story has been told, you need to take action. And do something very concrete.

• Low hanging fruits Pick the immediate results from the change. The immediate improvements. Show the a small, concrete advantage to the organization/company.

• Consolidate results (change) This is now how we work, this is how we generate results. And you have legitimate a certain way acting.

• Nailing/anchering This action/this change is now a part of how the organization act, solve and change.

Questions: • Where in this model do we meet the most resistance and change? Inviting people to come with ideas for a vision and strategy – often the leaders end up formulating both because the people of the organization are afraid to contribute, that they have to simple or stupid ideas. But when you get to the storytelling, the people get involved.

• What are the success criterias for creating a vision for a company? It is to get as many people as possible to form/formulate the vision and strategy.

• How do we deal with passive restistance? What will passive resistance lead to? Insome companies it will end with people being sacked if they are not engaged. But one important questions is: Why are the people passive? Why are they not engaged? Have workshop that “force” the employers to express their feelings. So that you can find out some of they why.

Leadership background Eight kinds of intelligence/abilities • Vision What do you want with your leadership? Is the job just interesting or do you want to move something?

• Communication Communication is key word. You have to be able tell stories to people, inform them. Communicate your thoughts.

• Heart/Passion You need to feel engaged in the job, have a passion and a feel for the job. Or else you become a techincal leader. Not necessarily fruitful in the long run.

• Team building How to build a team? How to create an atmosphere of mutual understanding and trust, a room where people dare to express themselves? But were you still act as the head/captain of the team?

• Preserveance Stayer ability. Do you have the stamina and the will to do what it takes to make something happen?

• Will to listen Do you read the signals, understand and listen to what is said to you? Are you perceptive?

• Social intelligence To be a social person. Understand the way people are together, the social mechanisms underlying our interaction. Be aware of and at least try to understand the cultural differences.

• Diversity Ability and courage to divcersity the group or people you are leading. Don’t make clones, dare to have diversity (background, skills and competences as well as ethnicity and sex)

Basic preconditions 4 basic traits • Knowledge Knowledge about cultural background and general knowledge about life

• Empathy The ability to understand how people react, take their feelings into consideration when making decisions

• Tolerance Open mind/. Open to other peoples opinions and interested in those opinions, not only tolerating other peoples opinions

• Ambition You have to have some wants, ambitions.

Informal qualifications • Know your weaknesses –be aware of how you react in different situations • Control of feelings, have a poker face. Don’t show your immediate dislikes. • Small talk (tend receptions. Hehehe) If the conversation is boring, put on the poker phase

Uffe Elbæk, KP

Leadership from a KaosPilot point of view By Uffe Elbæk

Agenda • Share 6 personal stories from my professional career (1982-2005) • 3 different perspectives on leadership and organization • Introduce 1 to 2 actual projects

Stories and their underlying patterns Story 1 Jimmy Larsen (the star of the circus) – Århus 1982 • Forced to take action and create my own job, if I am to get what I want. • How to work with motivation? Identify strenghts and abilities.

• Meet the outsider – feel their ambition. • Turn weaknesses into strengths, how to go into problem and find the hidden solution.

Story 2 Next Stop Sovjet – 1989 • Frontrunner almost shut down, • Caravans from Danmark to Sovjet – final concert on the Red Square (university) • Do you see any change and power in Sovjet? Yes, but not before 20 years have passed.

• Do not underrestimate social change • Weak signals. How do we train ourself to listen for the weak signals?

Story 3 Project Kaospilots - Jan 1991 • Econmic crisis for the Frontrunners • What kind of education should we have that could enable us to handle the projects

• Who should be the head of the school?

• What motivates us to say yes?

Story 4 Outpost in San Fransisco – 1996 • Meeting with important CEO – meeting failing miserably Why should I listen to you, and your story? Are you aware of the culture in the context you are? Do you know what you ask for? • Tip from VISA founder, 4 simple steps for handling failure. 1. Identify your failure – what went wrong? 2. Take your part of the responsibility for the failure, and know what the 3. What can I learn from this? 4. Do it differently next time

Story 5 Outpost in Durban, South Africa – 2001 • Do we really know where the deep, big change-waves come from?

• Political history as a medium • It is very easy to think about/imagine you know a lot, but do you act in the world? • Know all the facts, but you need your heart - Galtung

• What competences are needed to create results? Story 6 Vigdis Finbonadottir in Reykjavik - 2005 • What kind of culture is created when men are afraid of men?

• The many voices in an organization

3 perspectives on leadership/organizational behaviour Reflection 1 – 4 kinds of leadership DRAW FIGURE • Below: Leaders have to be able to move people in a certain direction,

• Besides: Peer to peer leadership – partners/collegues • Above: Leadership towards people above you • Myself: Personal leadership

What kind leadership to perfom on people below, besides, above you and at last (not least) how am I leader for myself? The result? A structure were everyone is supporting everyone.

Reflection 2 – Organizational structure at KP You have a structure were everyone is supporting everyone. The Kaospilot is in between this system and the old hierarchical structure. Kaospilot move between the old hierarchical structure, the fishnet and the atomic structure. When are the school supporting itself on what?

Reflection 3 – My vision/our vision • The paradox – My vision/Our vision Uffe: Vision . Strategy . Action plan . Time -> Result Staff: All have their individiual visions and strategies. Understand what motivates me and what motivates members of the staff to work at the Kaospilot. How does this work together? To manage to put the person vision into the collective vision Respect that there is something that is bigger than you. How can you incooperate your vision into a collective vision.

3 important words when we talk about change leadership • Identity • Meaning • Self Control Good leadership in change situation, so that they don’t loose their self-control.

One giant Leap project Time, mask, money, confrontation, god, inspiratiomn, sex, death, happy

Ørjan Jensen

How to navigate in organisations By Ørjan Jensen

Litterature Frederick Winslow Taylor Henri Fayol Elton Mayo’s Hawthorne studies/experiments (1927-1932) (Western Electric Hawthorne Works, Chicago) Iben Tranholm - Himmelflugten

Introduction • Military background

• The dialectic relationship between theories and practises.

• Learning starting from trying to navigate in the confusion.

• Leadership versus management

Background • Military • Kaospilot team manager • NLP – Neuro Linguistic Programming – how by changing language, you can change behaviour • Hypno therapist

Elements of leadership Mastery • What kind of expectations do leaders have today?

• Leadership books are talking about self-mastery.

• People/organizations that master self-mastery are able to lead themselves.

Flexibility • There are questions of quality and demand from people or in organisation. When to be flexible

• Not about doing what other people tell you do and accept those missions.

• Manouver tactics – if that happens, we do this, but when another thing happens we do that.

• Fight the old belief that all challenges can be met with planning.

• Being able to understand other peoples way of thinking as well as your own • Leadership is not about having followers accepting the leaders orders blindly.

Command and Control Leadership (back in fashion) Command and control, telling people what to do and what not do, taking care of them, taking all the reposibility. Controlling if you do your work correctly and controlling/checking if you are feeling ok. Beloved leaders that makes people insecure and passive

Why is this structure unhealthy? People not able to organise, manage themselves.

What is the alternative difficult? The complexity The efficiancy All the employees need to be commited

The caring leader today Make sure that the people are commited and take care of them by isolating the people that disagree/sabotage.

Organisation as an organism

Surveys International companies in the Western countires (Europe and USA) What kind of people do we find in organisation. 10% Self managers, by nature.

60% Reactive Want to change, but have to be activated to change.

30% Blocked The more you try to involve them, change them, the more they block themselves out/in

The last 30% gets the most attention. 90% of the resources. And they will be the people that are fired in the future.

University students 3% of the students starting at the university have a goal with their education. A plan.

Navigate in organisations • No one is holding the truth, because there is no truth. • Map the territory (prejects; revealing the intentions and points of view)

• Flexibitlity is about accepting that the map is not the territtory.

Types of manouvering • Trip on a boat – looking through the back window.

• Look at future, what do I want, what to happen, where do I want to go. Find a strategy in for

Learning Classic definition of learning: Relatively lasting change of behaviour Modern definition of learning: Learning is a change of action and thinking

Wrap-up Exercise: Rub your hands together until they get warm. Fold your hands and see what thumb is on top. Rub your hands together again. This time let the other tumb be on top. (Ref. Ketan’s exercise on our resistance to change)

Navigate yourself through life in organisations towards a goal. Remember to not be afraid to change the goal.

New disease: Being burned out People with no goals, no ambition and either not knowing what they want or wanting nothing. Our way of thinking is affection our body to a large extent. Placebo affect – self-healing Self-fulfilling prophecies

Stability versus change 80% want more of the same, only 20% look for new things/welcome change.

Questions • What is my goal with being here? What is the motivation for my actions. • Is it good enough to be the person who feels how she resists change, but still does it?

Frank Aggerholm, Danish University of Education

An academic introduction systemic thinking and communication By Frank Agerholm

Def. Kaospilot Navigate in chaos Reduce complexity

Main focus 1. Overall introduction to Niklas Luhmann system theory 2. Different kinds of social systems – different kinds of communication 3. Organizations and a perspective on leadership 4. Questions, discussion and/or reflection

Complexity

Main points/presumptions in the system theory

• You cannot fight complexity E.g. the founding of a grass root organization with the proclaimed aim to fight complexity would itself just produce more complexity

• The surrounding world is always more complex than the system. vs. The system is always more complex than the surrounding world can grasp

• The more complex the system, the more complexity is able to reduce

• All the systems are in the world

• An observer (a specific system) can from his/her own point of observation observe:

• Whatever is observed, something else could be observed instead – thus observations are contingent.

• Whatever the point of observation, it would have been another point of observation – thus the point of observation is contingent.

• Since observations are contingent and the points of observations likewise are contingent, this relation between the point of observation and the observed is double-contingent. Very complex.

• Foreign complexity can only be reduced by its own complexity

• Foreign reference can only be constructed by self-reference

Main aphorism of system theory

What are systems?

Psychical systems think – thus operate on the basis of though/consciousness Social systems communicate – thus operate on the basis of comminication

General characteristics for systems Structual determination

Systems constitute and upload themselves through producingg and maintaining difference to the surrounding world. In other words, they set a boundary between system and the surrounding world.

How does a system create relatations to the surrounding world, when nothing from the surrounding world enters the system and v ice versa and the distinction between the system and the surrounding world is an autopoietic operation?

Opeative Closure and Structural Coupling

The answer to the question is that the realtion is deteminded by Operative Closure and Structural Coupling.

• Operative Closure

• Structural Coupling

• Interdenpendancy

• Interpenetration

Selection as reductionof complexity Different kinds of systems make selection on different basic

Psychical systems and reduction of complexity

Consciousness – psychical operation The psychical system is to be understood as the conscious mind Thoughts produce thoughts Brain and the conscious mind:

(Rest of slide must be added)

Social systems and reduction of complexity

Communication = social operation 3 Selections

Sometimes a fouth is mentioned (control of understanding)

The selections are produced by communication itself Luhmann aphorisms:

(How can the mind participate in communication? In Racsch, W – Theories of distinction, p. 169)

How can social systems commnicate?

When a system meet a disturbance, the system needs to make a selection (find a solution). By making that slection you volunteer to reduce the complexity in that communication.

Different social systems – communication

Communication and Medium

Psychical and social systems use mediums for their autopoietic

Different kinds of social systems:

All types of social systems work on the basic of communication, depend on the 3 selections:

Interactions • Constributions form two or more psychical systems • The participants are able to percieve eachother simuntaneoulsy Or rather, the participants are able to percieve each others contribution to communication simultaneously.

• An interaction system emerges. People meet and communicate • It just happens and when it no longer happens the interaction system dissolves (Lack one sentence)

Society systems Segmentary differentiated society systems

Stratified differentiated society system

Functionally differentiated societies

ALL THREE TYPES EXIST.

Functionally differentiated society systems - FDSS

• Increased complexity calls for more complex ways of reducing complexity • The need for more complex ways of handling complexity calls for different functions, thereof the name. • FDSSs uses different symbolic generalized mediums in the reduction of complexity • In regards to the medium they furthermore differentiate on the basis of binary codes • In order to reflect this, the complexity is furthermore reduced by different reflection programs:

CODE AND REFLECTION PROGRAMS (GET FROM SLIDE)

Social system Medium Code Relection Program Religion Truth/faith Immanence/Transcendence Theology Economy Money Payment/Profit Prices/Costs/Accounting

Function, contribution and institutionalization • FDSSs have different functions • They make contribtion to society in different ways • They institutionalize in different ways (GET OVERVIEW FORM SLIDE)

Social system Function Contribution Institutionalisation Economy Shortage reduction Satisfaction of needs Companies Religion Handling of contingency Deacony Chuches, mosque etc

Organizations and leadership

Organizations

Makes the distinction to the surrounding world in a different way than interaction system and FDSS A spesific social system Replaces the external dependencies on internal dependencies which the organization produces itself. It makes its own conditions for

This provides particular structures of expectation, which helps reducing complexity, iternally and externally.

The organization is nor entirely insensitive to foreign disturbance (pertubation)

The identity of the organization is challenged by internal and external disturbance. And it takes ongoing decisions and negotiations to keep up the identity – a complexity which again shapes identity. (Negotiate forth your reality in communication with others – Ouafa Rian)

Leadership (Frank Agerholm thoughs) Segemtary

Stratified

Functionally differentiated

ALL THREE EXIST TODAY – WHICH ONE DESCRIBES YOU?


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Johan Galtung, Founder of The International Peace Research Institute

Laila Wodke Nissen, Physical Trainer

Syllabus for KaosPilots team 12 Autumn 2005

Focus on the body 3 modules for each group of team 12 (divided in two groups)

You will work with the basic understanding of body-awareness and how to use the sensing body as an active tool in your daily life, in your relationships, work, choice-making and well-being. We will be using methods from the Martial arts, free dancing, Body Awareness Therapy, theatre etc.

Schedule Wednesday 26th October/ 2nd November

Wednesday 9th November/ 23rd November

Wednesday 30th November/ 7th December

In general It is crucial that you participate in all three modules in order to understand your own process-work. Wear clothes you can move and sweat in, we are going to dance, play and move. Bring a bottle of water.

I am looking forward to work with you.

Best regards Laila Wodtke Nissen HumanMove ~moving people www.humanmove.dk info@humanmove.dk


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Syllabus for KaosPilots team 12 Autumn 2005

Focus on the body 3 modules for each group of team 12 (divided in two groups)

You will work with the basic understanding of body-awareness and how to use the sensing body as an active tool in your daily life, in your relationships, work, choice-making and well-being. We will be using methods from the Martial arts, free dancing, Body Awareness Therapy, theatre etc.

Schedule Wednesday 26th October/ 2nd November

Wednesday 9th November/ 23rd November

Wednesday 30th November/ 7th December

In general It is crucial that you participate in all three modules in order to understand your own process-work. Wear clothes you can move and sweat in, we are going to dance, play and move. Bring a bottle of water.

I am looking forward to work with you.

Best regards Laila Wodtke Nissen HumanMove ~moving people www.humanmove.dk info@humanmove.dk


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Week 45

Marketing and Branding

Kasper Arentoft, Learning Zone KP

Dag Ingefjeld

Marketing and Branding By Dag Inge Fjeld

DAY 1

Focus groups - Experts versus the thoughts of the ordinary man

Advertising/PR/Events When advertising focus on:

Medium users should be try Don’t refer to the segment that is uninterested in your product. If you want to recruit these constumers you use PR/event, not advertising.

Businesses are motivated by an attack, offence. Forget inner strife in the organisation.

Marketing and branding 3 building blocks: • Positioning: How to differentiate yourself in the mind of your prospect • Consumer insight • Communication strategy

Positioning New products: Looks strange in the beginning, but after a while we get used to it – resistance to change. They have to be different.

Consumer insight Love your constumers “Fashion becomes unfashionable when the wrong people understand the code” Lifestyle is relational, brands are relational. Know your costumers, conceptualize a brand into their lifestyle

Communication strategies Start-ups brings innovation, brings competition versus large, maintenance companies (with branches). The smaller compines are easier to move, they are more aggressive and you often communicate with the founder. The result is that these companies almost always get/have better communication strategies

Persuadability Brand-maintenance

Copy writer (good at social interactions) “Advertising can persuade by relating to how the world is viewed through the eyes of the target group”

Premises Motivational insight on the target group Why do people dress, live, eat, decorate their homes as they do? People don’t talk about what motivates them. But you can see patterns/structures when you see how a person decorate their home or raise their children. People are here telling their story of their life. What is the narrative of their lifes? That is what motivates them to different actions. You have to have a brand that is not in conflict with that narrative.

Articulating your message Put your brand into their world view/local view, by referring to it. Position your message according to the clients wishes (Synnøve Finden or Tine)

Henrik Dahl – Hvis din nabo var en bil “There are as many narratives that there are political parties”

Dramatizing your message (Cult status of products: technological inferior, but still great sales. E.g. The Beetle)

Dramatizing the consumer benefit. • Advertising is not only about humor & entertainment. Entertaining advertisments doesn’t secure a sale. • Reason why-advertising

• Customers giving hard facts as reason for buying a product. • Brands turn into functional products when the products are no longer visible for an audience.

• Becoming visible to the consumer, even though you are not visible (hardware, underwear) • Being the opposite to what is expected. (E.g. Jack in the Box) --- “Culture eats strategy for breakfast if you don’t have an organisational culture to endorse it.”

Conglomerates are slow, internally struggling because of all the different branches. Often not very profitable. A solution is “a house of brands” – different identities (E.g. Apple) A name has to stand for something, it can’t stand for everything. That is not trustworthy. (Exceptions Virgin, General Electric)

Jack Welch – Winning

---

Content and Form (appearance) The visual in building a brand: • Spokesperson You need a spokesperson or a usergroup for the product, or else it is almost impossible to position. Create ethos/credibility

• Communication Everythig communicates: Clothing, interior, logos, color (blue, red, black), body language (Advertising agencies functions as casting agencies). Must confirm archetypes, can’t go against it. Important to stick to what you are known for, what you are good at. Every that can talk, is talking. People are interested in phenomena.

Erving Goffman - http://www.blackwood.org/Erving.htm

History of big/strong brands Why are they successful? • Consistance behaviour over time

• Been the first in one category. Small category at that time

• Build as a category through PR (position product) • Communicate leadership through advertising and events (brand-maintenance)

PR to spell out what this new thing is. Or to create a spin on what this new thing is.

“Think category first, brand second. Unless you can define a new brand in terms of a new category, the new brand is unlikely to be successful.” Al Ries and Laura Ries - The origin of brands

Use of music in advertising • Must fit with the message/brand • Brand recognision, song assosiated with brand • Re-introduce an old song and sell it together with concept/brand

But be aware of the fact the music assosiation, it might be a wrong assosiation.

Product placement Get inside the program as the advertising spot between shows is getting less attractive. Product placement is illegal in EU versus Hollywood You are allowed to introduce a product in a show, if you don’t pay for it. But you can for advertising before and after the show (as a way of compensating)

Lights, cameras, brands

Build in your product in a show.

Branding characters – George – Larry Davis “Curb your enthusiasm” – the series

Case study Edward Bernays (1891-1995) Inventor of the PR-industry. Nephew of Sigmund Freund. First one to manipulate the press. Positioning products along the lines of the subconscious. Larry Tye - The Father of Spin: Edward L. Bernays and The Birth of Public Relations Spin (how to spin a story, twist it, create a certain angle) Torches of Freedom march – women smoking sigarettes in the street , 31. March 1929

DAY 2

Principles in business • Being a specialist (business, sport), not a generalist • Being the first “in mind” Not necessarily first in market, but the first thing people think of when describing a category (MP3=iPod) People love new, but it is about perception, not the product.

• Defining a category

Usergroups Heavy users – medium users: Keep them happy 20% of the customers stands for 80% of the profit. Keep them happy Accept and respect your fanbase, and that some people will never like your product. Don’t use advertising money on people that don’t buy your product. If you want to change their behaviour, use PR

PR Press stories: E.g Journalist describing your product in a feature way

Competetive strategies Strength in a weakness: Find and explore the strength and use it Touch base, get people to see these obvious strengths in a new way.

Weakness in a strength: Always a weakness in strength Polarising when exploring weaknesses in stength (E.g The Economist making a cover story were they explore why they predicted wrong about oil prices.)

(Karl Rove – strategist for Bush-boys) Cinderella story (the beauty, the willing person that is left out, placed in the shadow. People’s symphaty)

Monopolies versus challengers Differentiate yourself from the other challengers (E.g. Hertz versus Avis) People like to choose between two. Better to be number to in one category, than number one in a small category Remember that customers like the role of the challenger, be careful not to overrule that opinion.

A bordieu approach to consumer insight Pierre Bourdieu – La dinstinction (french sosiologist)

Why would someone buy a Rolex when a Swatch is more accurate? Why would someone given a Rolex choose not to use it? To understand this we must look at the person as a whole, his/her background and the environment he/she is functioning in.

Bourdieu critique of Kant’s philosophy of estetics that taste in art is not about being emotionally aroused, but intellectually challenged.

Sosioraster

Litterature: Positioning – Al Ries, Jack Trout (classic, buy the 20 year anniversary version) Marketing Warfare – Al Ries, Jack Trout (Using Art of War, Karl von Clausewitz quotes on war, in the marketing world) The Origin of Brands – Al Ries and Laura Ries The Father of Spin: Edward L. Bernays and The Birth of Public Relations – Larry Tye Winning – Jack Welch Hvis din nabo var en bil – Henrik Dahl (lifestyle, written upon Bordieu) La dinstinction (1979) – Pierre Bourdieu (french sociologist) Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste (1984) – english translation

Branding

• Private verus public sevices. Brands have value only where consumers have choice

• Consumer trust is the basis of all brand values

• Change: Customers pay more for a brand because it seems to represent a way of life or a set of ideas. Emotional needs as well as their consumer desire.

• Branding as storytelling. Stories consumers buy.

• Brands give protestors of branding far more power over companies than they would otherwise have.

Protestor view • Companies are switching from producing products to marketing aspirations, images and lifestyles • Move of production from first world to third world contries

Clarifications • Consumers will tolerate a lousy product for far longer than they will tolerate a lousy lifestyle.

• Next thing in brands is sosial responsibility


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Marketing and Branding By Dag Inge Fjeld

DAY 1

Focus groups - Experts versus the thoughts of the ordinary man

Advertising/PR/Events When advertising focus on:

Medium users should be try Don’t refer to the segment that is uninterested in your product. If you want to recruit these constumers you use PR/event, not advertising.

Businesses are motivated by an attack, offence. Forget inner strife in the organisation.

Marketing and branding 3 building blocks: • Positioning: How to differentiate yourself in the mind of your prospect • Consumer insight • Communication strategy

Positioning New products: Looks strange in the beginning, but after a while we get used to it – resistance to change. They have to be different.

Consumer insight Love your constumers “Fashion becomes unfashionable when the wrong people understand the code” Lifestyle is relational, brands are relational. Know your costumers, conceptualize a brand into their lifestyle

Communication strategies Start-ups brings innovation, brings competition versus large, maintenance companies (with branches). The smaller compines are easier to move, they are more aggressive and you often communicate with the founder. The result is that these companies almost always get/have better communication strategies

Persuadability Brand-maintenance

Copy writer (good at social interactions) “Advertising can persuade by relating to how the world is viewed through the eyes of the target group”

Premises Motivational insight on the target group Why do people dress, live, eat, decorate their homes as they do? People don’t talk about what motivates them. But you can see patterns/structures when you see how a person decorate their home or raise their children. People are here telling their story of their life. What is the narrative of their lifes? That is what motivates them to different actions. You have to have a brand that is not in conflict with that narrative.

Articulating your message Put your brand into their world view/local view, by referring to it. Position your message according to the clients wishes (Synnøve Finden or Tine)

Henrik Dahl – Hvis din nabo var en bil “There are as many narratives that there are political parties”

Dramatizing your message (Cult status of products: technological inferior, but still great sales. E.g. The Beetle)

Dramatizing the consumer benefit. • Advertising is not only about humor & entertainment. Entertaining advertisments doesn’t secure a sale. • Reason why-advertising

• Customers giving hard facts as reason for buying a product. • Brands turn into functional products when the products are no longer visible for an audience.

• Becoming visible to the consumer, even though you are not visible (hardware, underwear) • Being the opposite to what is expected. (E.g. Jack in the Box) --- “Culture eats strategy for breakfast if you don’t have an organisational culture to endorse it.”

Conglomerates are slow, internally struggling because of all the different branches. Often not very profitable. A solution is “a house of brands” – different identities (E.g. Apple) A name has to stand for something, it can’t stand for everything. That is not trustworthy. (Exceptions Virgin, General Electric)

Jack Welch – Winning

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Content and Form (appearance) The visual in building a brand: • Spokesperson You need a spokesperson or a usergroup for the product, or else it is almost impossible to position. Create ethos/credibility

• Communication Everythig communicates: Clothing, interior, logos, color (blue, red, black), body language (Advertising agencies functions as casting agencies). Must confirm archetypes, can’t go against it. Important to stick to what you are known for, what you are good at. Every that can talk, is talking. People are interested in phenomena.

Erving Goffman - http://www.blackwood.org/Erving.htm

History of big/strong brands Why are they successful? • Consistance behaviour over time

• Been the first in one category. Small category at that time

• Build as a category through PR (position product) • Communicate leadership through advertising and events (brand-maintenance)

PR to spell out what this new thing is. Or to create a spin on what this new thing is.

“Think category first, brand second. Unless you can define a new brand in terms of a new category, the new brand is unlikely to be successful.” Al Ries and Laura Ries - The origin of brands

Use of music in advertising • Must fit with the message/brand • Brand recognision, song assosiated with brand • Re-introduce an old song and sell it together with concept/brand

But be aware of the fact the music assosiation, it might be a wrong assosiation.

Product placement Get inside the program as the advertising spot between shows is getting less attractive. Product placement is illegal in EU versus Hollywood You are allowed to introduce a product in a show, if you don’t pay for it. But you can for advertising before and after the show (as a way of compensating)

Lights, cameras, brands

Build in your product in a show.

Branding characters – George – Larry Davis “Curb your enthusiasm” – the series

Case study Edward Bernays (1891-1995) Inventor of the PR-industry. Nephew of Sigmund Freund. First one to manipulate the press. Positioning products along the lines of the subconscious. Larry Tye - The Father of Spin: Edward L. Bernays and The Birth of Public Relations Spin (how to spin a story, twist it, create a certain angle) Torches of Freedom march – women smoking sigarettes in the street , 31. March 1929

DAY 2

Principles in business • Being a specialist (business, sport), not a generalist • Being the first “in mind” Not necessarily first in market, but the first thing people think of when describing a category (MP3=iPod) People love new, but it is about perception, not the product.

• Defining a category

Usergroups Heavy users – medium users: Keep them happy 20% of the customers stands for 80% of the profit. Keep them happy Accept and respect your fanbase, and that some people will never like your product. Don’t use advertising money on people that don’t buy your product. If you want to change their behaviour, use PR

PR Press stories: E.g Journalist describing your product in a feature way

Competetive strategies Strength in a weakness: Find and explore the strength and use it Touch base, get people to see these obvious strengths in a new way.

Weakness in a strength: Always a weakness in strength Polarising when exploring weaknesses in stength (E.g The Economist making a cover story were they explore why they predicted wrong about oil prices.)

(Karl Rove – strategist for Bush-boys) Cinderella story (the beauty, the willing person that is left out, placed in the shadow. People’s symphaty)

Monopolies versus challengers Differentiate yourself from the other challengers (E.g. Hertz versus Avis) People like to choose between two. Better to be number to in one category, than number one in a small category Remember that customers like the role of the challenger, be careful not to overrule that opinion.

A bordieu approach to consumer insight Pierre Bourdieu – La dinstinction (french sosiologist)

Why would someone buy a Rolex when a Swatch is more accurate? Why would someone given a Rolex choose not to use it? To understand this we must look at the person as a whole, his/her background and the environment he/she is functioning in.

Bourdieu critique of Kant’s philosophy of estetics that taste in art is not about being emotionally aroused, but intellectually challenged.

Sosioraster

Litterature: Positioning – Al Ries, Jack Trout (classic, buy the 20 year anniversary version) Marketing Warfare – Al Ries, Jack Trout (Using Art of War, Karl von Clausewitz quotes on war, in the marketing world) The Origin of Brands – Al Ries and Laura Ries The Father of Spin: Edward L. Bernays and The Birth of Public Relations – Larry Tye Winning – Jack Welch Hvis din nabo var en bil – Henrik Dahl (lifestyle, written upon Bordieu) La dinstinction (1979) – Pierre Bourdieu (french sociologist) Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste (1984) – english translation

Branding

• Private verus public sevices. Brands have value only where consumers have choice

• Consumer trust is the basis of all brand values

• Change: Customers pay more for a brand because it seems to represent a way of life or a set of ideas. Emotional needs as well as their consumer desire.

• Branding as storytelling. Stories consumers buy.

• Brands give protestors of branding far more power over companies than they would otherwise have.

Protestor view • Companies are switching from producing products to marketing aspirations, images and lifestyles • Move of production from first world to third world contries

Clarifications • Consumers will tolerate a lousy product for far longer than they will tolerate a lousy lifestyle.

• Next thing in brands is sosial responsibility


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Wekk 46

Marketing and Branding

Synnøve Finden Workshop

Process with Team 1 Norway

Wekk 47

Marketing and Branding

Group Work

Wekk 48

Marketing and Branding

Group Work

Wekk 49

Marketing and Branding

Group Work

Wekk 50

First Semester Evaluation

Evaluation on Group Projects, Kasper Arentoft

Evaluation of Trip to Norway, Gry Guldberg

Evaluation of First Semester, Tine Meisner

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